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Cash register reconciliation

Posted on 2013-10-22
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Last Modified: 2013-11-06
I am starting to build a database to reconcile the daily sales at my store.
I am planning on asking questions as I get stumped but before I started I thought that...
If you could recommend some structure (architecturally) for me to base my database on?

I will have "X Tapes" that are quick day reports of sales from start of day to the point of the report, and "Z Tape" that are from start of day to end of day reports and start the process over the next day.
If the Z tape is pulled in the middle of the day it will start anew after report
I am using Microsoft Access 2013
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Question by:JevonMartin
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 500 total points
ID: 39592722
For the "X" tape, I would simply timestamp the transactions.   You can then pull a report for any date/time range that you wish.

For the "Z" tape, include a batch ID field in the table.  Two ways you can use this:

1. Leave it blank until a close out is performed.   Report any transaction with a blank Batch ID, generate a batch ID, then update the records.

2. Have a current batch ID in a batch table.   Something like:

BatchID
CreatedOn
ClosedOn

ClosedOn being null until you close the batch.   Any new transaction is saved with the current batch ID.   When you want to close out, update the current batch ID with a ClosedOn Date/time, and generate a new batch record.

 Then allow reporting for any batch.

 These are just a couple of ideas and there would be many ways to structure this.   You'd also probably want to allow for multiple registers/terminals as well.

Jim.
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LVL 57
ID: 39592729
Best way to approach this by the way is:

1. Determine every type and kind of report or inquiry that you will want out of the application.   ie.   Transactions by Employee, by register, by product/service, by category, etc.

2. Determine what data you'll need to collect.

3. Start on database design.

  Sounds obvious, but many people really don't give #1 a lot of thought.  Many start at #2, then end up down a dead end because they didn't think about what they wanted to get out first.

 Then #3 and the app often changes drastically.

Jim.
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