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Experiments for "Science Sunday" for my 6yr old

My daughter and I try to do a science experiment each week on "Science Sunday". So far, we've:
dissolved the shell of an egg with vinegar
put an egg in a glass of water, then added salt until it floats
tested if vinegar mixed with dishwashing liquid or shampoo foams better than plain vinegar when baking soda is added

I'd like some ideas for some easy, fun experiments. Thanks!
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Terry Woods
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Terry Woods
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3 Solutions
 
speed_54Commented:
Fun Science Experiments for Kids - Cool Projects & Easy Ideas for Children
http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/experiments.html

Science Explorer: At Home Science Projects | Exploratorium
http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/
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Terry WoodsIT GuruAuthor Commented:
Rather than just links I was hoping for a recommendation for a particular experiment that someone has done (especially if you have a 6yr old that enjoyed it) and thought was particularly neat.

But thanks for the links; I will have a look.
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ienaxxxCommented:
i made (with my 5yo daughter)
---the oil and water with color and effervescent pill. was really fun and gave me the starting point to explain her the mass and floating forces.

--the coloured flower (it is really good when the flower is white and the color is dark but not black or brilliant.) i made a variant with fluorescent colors but it wasn't that success. It gaves me the start to expain her how plants suck water and photosynthesis

-- i made an experiment with a baloon and a lot of thumbtacks. Showed her that the baloon pops when a single thumbtack is placed up on the table while doesn't when there are a lot of thumbtacks. It gave me the starting point to explain mass and weight distribution.
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Thibault St john Cholmondeley-ffeatherstonehaugh the 2ndCommented:
we made a hair-hygrometer for my daughter's school project. She complained a bit when I grabbed a few strands of her hair, but her's was the only hair long enough.
Calibrated it in the kitchen when it was steamy and it showed a noticeable difference on a hand made scale when the room was dry.
All it needs is a scale, a moveable pointer and a couple of hairs.
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
I'm young enough to remember what my father did with me when I was 6 (my oldest isn't 6 yet).

We did the colored flower thing. It works really well with Queen Anne's Lace. You can split the stem and do two colors on the same flower.

What I remember having the most fun with was dry ice. Put some in a big bowl and let it "melt" and blow soap bubbles into the bowl. They float on air.
Put several pieces of dry ice in a balloon and tie it. It will slowly fill until all the ice melts.
The bubbling steam it makes when you put it in water is also very neat.
Put some dry ice in an empty cup then light a candle and pour the air from the cup over the candle.
There's lots of other ideas on the internet of what to do with it (we've done almost all of them). If you make ice cream with it (I've done that one several times) use a fine mesh strainer so you don't get any little chunks in the milk.
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aburrCommented:
Get a flat board, a ball, and a helium balloon. Put them in a car and start up. The ball rolls backward and the balloon goes forward.
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aburrCommented:
Heat a long glass bottle in the oven, not too hot.  Take it out, invert it with the mouth just under  water in a pan. Let it cool.
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Terry WoodsIT GuruAuthor Commented:
Thanks! The dye in flowers idea is great for this weekend, as it's spring here and there's lots of flowers. I also like the heated glass bottle one. I wonder where I can buy dry ice, and how much it costs? I suspect it won't be readily available in my area (a small city in NZ).
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
I buy dry ice at the local grocery store (in the U.S.). It's about $2 a pound. It's used often enough in shipping that it's not too hard to come by.

A pound is more than enough to play with.
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