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Backups!

Posted on 2013-10-23
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Last Modified: 2013-10-24
Hi Experts,

We've got a directory location with about a terabyte of data that we'd like to backup on a dedicated server (Windows Server 2008).  The client side is an XP machine.  Is there a something built into Windows that would allow me to do this?  Detecting changes on the binary level is probably what we should shoot for to reduce bandwidth because there are large files.

Thanks for any help!
Mike
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Question by:thready
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Expert Comment

by:Robert Saylor
ID: 39594402
Give fbackup a try. It supports network shares.

http://www.fbackup.com/
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Author Comment

by:thready
ID: 39594408
I won't be exposing a network share - the dedicated machine is in another country and we're not on a VPN...
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Accepted Solution

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Don Thomson earned 500 total points
ID: 39597133
Without a network share or VPN connection - it won't be easy to back up your data to a remote server.

If you can manage to find a software package that creates a series of incremental data files each day using a separate file name for each incremental day then you could possibly FTP the data to the remote - the Major problem with that is if you have to restore some data, you then have to restore the original backup and every incremental file since you started.

There are many on-line backup storage facilities that will let you do a full backup and then backup only the delta each day. For a terabyte of data it will cost in the range of $300-800 per month to do this.

That get real expensive - real fast. You would be better off to get a simple PC off site and set up a VPN to it.

The proper process would be to make a copy of the folder once or twice each day - on a separate drive on the original PC. Then set up your VPN to the offsite PC. Do your initial backup to this offsite PC with the PC initially co-located on the same network as the initial PC being backed up. Then move it off-site. The biggest propblem will be making sure that the files on the Backed up folder can be copied (Many database structures leave files open and they can not be copied while they are open - Most SQL databases are like this.

If this is the case then you would have to use some software that is designed to handle open file databases. Most databases will allow you to automatically back up the database while it's open. You then copy that backup and all the other normal files over to the initial backup drive.  That's what you end up backing up to the offsite PC.

For a terabyte of info you will most likely need a PC with a Raid 5 at the other end and the initial size would have to be approx 4 times the compressed value of the initial database. You can determine that compressed size using any compression software. The Easiest way would be to use WiinZip or simply right mouse click on the initial  backup folder size and do a sent to compressed file.

The first incremental will give you an idea of how much data storage you will need at the far end.

For Instance if the Initial compressed backup size is 300Gb  and the first incremental size is 3 Gb  then your incremental changes are about 1% per day
Figuring on that then in a year your 300gb backup will have grown to about 700-800 gb
Your raid-5 size should then be about 3-4 terabytes.

This can be reduced if you want to have two raid 5 clusters on the backup PC and do your backups on each the first set for say 90 days - then carry the backup PC to the initial site and start a new initial backup on the second raid set.  When the third cycle comes around - you can delete the 1st set of backup sets - that way you will always have from 90-180 days of backups.

We have been doing backup for our clients since the early 1990's and have gone through just about every type of off-site backup  technology from mainframe backup to massive service bureau services.  

We have settled now on a backup facility that allows users to backup mission critical data off-site and complete machine backup - on-site to another local device.  They only charge us for the maximum size of the original data and let us have an unlimited  number of incremental backups.  We have client who regularly restore files that were accidentally deleted or overwritten  up to 3 years ago.
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Author Closing Comment

by:thready
ID: 39597225
We found bacula.  But your solution was very in depth, thank you!
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