Solved

Any way to access shares on a domain client when SBS2003 is down for repair

Posted on 2013-10-23
5
335 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-01
Unfortunately our old SBS2003 server died yesterday a few weeks before being replaced.  Had already moved files to NAS storage.  Biggest problem I have is that we can't connect to the accounts system share which is on an XP domain client machine.  All data is there and intact (couldn't move to old server due to performance and space problems).

When I try and access the client share from another domain PC a logon screen appears. Basically rejects any logons including domain administrator because there is no authentication server.

Is there any way to circumvent this? Also the permissions and securty on the share allows everyone access but I still cannot access from another PC (I didn't set this up).
0
Comment
Question by:ianmal2
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 21

Assisted Solution

by:Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP
Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP earned 200 total points
ID: 39595908
Are you include the domain name in front of the user name?

Example:

xpcomputername\user

I usually map a drive letter to the share. Be sure to select Connect using different credentials. You may want to also select  and Reconnect at logon. Enter a domain user and password. If you also check the Remember my credentials it will automatically connect without asking for the username and password each time.

Note: When entering the user name you will need to prefix it with the domain to log onto

Map drive
from my post here: http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Q_28274164.html#a39592560
0
 
LVL 46

Accepted Solution

by:
Craig Beck earned 300 total points
ID: 39595937
I think what TheHiTechCoach means is to use a user account which is local to the XP machine.

Have you tried creating a local user account on the XP machine, then logging in using that account instead, using the instructions in the previous post?
0
 
LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:Sandeshdubey
ID: 39595957
You can use local admin of client computer to assign the permission and move data.
0
 
LVL 21
ID: 39596307
@craigbeck, you are correct. Thanks  for clarifying that.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:ianmal2
ID: 39599591
Sorry for the slow response. It's been hectic as you can imagine with the Server dying. I've managed to get one client to connect to the share on the Accounts PC by logging in to the client with a cached domain account then when I tried to acces the accounts share entering the domain credentials of the user who is actually logged on to the Accounts PC.

I used same method on two others I need but didn't work a 2nd time.

Hope that makes sense. In summary the following worked on 1 PC only;

Accounts PC - logged in as domain user1 and acually using accounts software
PC2 - logged in as domain user2. Used credentials of user1 to connect to Accounts PC share.

I will try setting up a shared drive as suggested above over the weekend. Also will try variations on credentials enterd to access share.
0

Featured Post

Does Powershell have you tied up in knots?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Did you know that more than 4 billion data records have been recorded as lost or stolen since 2013? It was a staggering number brought to our attention during last week’s ManageEngine webinar, where attendees received a comprehensive look at the ma…
A hard and fast method for reducing Active Directory Administrators members.
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of transferring the five major, necessary Active Directory Roles, commonly referred to as the FSMO roles to another domain controller. Log onto the new domain controller with a user account t…
Microsoft Active Directory, the widely used IT infrastructure, is known for its high risk of credential theft. The best way to test your Active Directory’s vulnerabilities to pass-the-ticket, pass-the-hash, privilege escalation, and malware attacks …

710 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question