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Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Clustering

Posted on 2013-10-24
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Last Modified: 2014-11-12
Greetings,
  I am seeking advice on a small business setup as follows:

Two physical buildings located on same property we will call them building1 and building2.

Building1

Server1:
Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Host (part of Hyper-V cluster)
- VM1 - Windows Server 2012 configured as DC
- VM2 - Windows Server 2012 with Exchange 2013

NAS1:
Buffalo Terastation 3400
- Configured to store all VM's
- Configured to store all Backups
- Configured to replicate with NAS2
- Configured to failover to NAS2

Building2

Server2:
Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Host
- Configured as part of a Hyper-V Cluster

NAS2:
Buffalo Terastation 3400
- Configured to replicate with NAS1


My initial thoughts are that I run both VM's from Server1 and store the VM images on NAS1.  Server1 is part of a Hyper-V cluster that "should" fire up the VM's on Server2 if Server1 goes down.  They are not high useage VM's but I could run one VM on each server and let them swap back and forth as needed in a failover situation if thats better.

NAS1 will hold all the VM's data and replicates to NAS2 and if it fails is set for failover to NAS2.

MY questions are:

1) Is this a decent way to handle this? We are looking for economical HA.
2) Should I run one VM on each server and just setup the cluster to allow both to run on either if needed?
3) Are there any issues with running VM's from a NAS?  In my lab environment I can create VM's on the NAS but have intermittent issues if I reboot them etc.  The new NAS's will have iSCSI target support, should I use this instead of normal network storage?

Thanks
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Question by:compcreate
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Will Szymkowski earned 500 total points
ID: 39598593
Answers are below...

1. Typically you would use some sort of SAN which has high avalibility at the storage level and can take multiple disk failures before something drastic could happen. The solution can always be better if you have the funds to support it.

2. If they are in a cluster why not take advantage of the hardware in question? This way you have your resources balanced and 1 host is sitting there doing nothing (waiting for primary to fail). Utilize the hardware you have, its in a cluster so if one host fails the second one picks up the load.

3. I have not ran VM from a NAS storage before but if you have the throuhput to support the demand i do not see why it can't work. If you are looking to have an economical way of doing this then NAS might be the best way. Just make sure that you have sufficient bandwidth.

Will.
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