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Disk size (C:)of Windows server 2008

I have windows server 2008, with C: partition of 100GB.
the disk is showing full. However when I take a look at the size of each folder including the hidden ones, the only folders that take space are Windows(15GB) and Program files folders(65GB) the rest are not really big enough to match the 20GB .
So which folders or files are filling up the 20GB?

any help?

Thanks
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jskfan
Asked:
jskfan
11 Solutions
 
Nick RhodeIT DirectorCommented:
Are you using a program to see where the bulk data hides like treesize?

http://www.jam-software.com/freeware/
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
A "nicer" looking app for viewing your disk space usage is SpaceSniffer: http://www.uderzo.it/main_products/space_sniffer/

Just make sure to run it as administrator.

HTH,
Dan
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
can I run those tools remotely against the server...
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
WinDirStat is free for commercial use, I don't think TreeSize is.

And WinDirStat can run against UNC Shares (meaning you can run it remotely).

Finally, verify Volume Shadow Copy hasn't eaten up space - there have been several occasions I've found it enabled on a server with no limit and that eats up space in a hidden way.
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
SpaceSniffer works with UNC paths too:

spacesniffer.exe scan \\path\to\server
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I check shadowcopy and it is disabled
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
You'll have a pagefile.sys in the root which will be quite large.  I expect you have several user accounts (C:\Users) and those folders are likely taking up space.  If you're not logged in as an administrator, you may not be able to discern them.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
example please:
spacesniffer.exe scan \\servername\C
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CompProbSolvCommented:
Have you checked for hidden files in the root, especially a swap file?  Depending on how much RAM you have, it could easily be 20G in size.

I have not used SpaceSniffer, but have used TreeSize many times.  You can use the Pro version (not the free one) on a share, so it would do the job if you have C: shared (not usually a wise practice).
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
You'll need to be able to access \\servername\c.

Type the address into an Explorer address bar and check if you can access it.

If you can't, you need to share the "C" partition, cause spacesniffer cannot use C$.

Also, over the network spacesniffer might not be able to "see" system files.

If you cannot remote into your server to run the tools there, your best bet might be a WMI or powershell script with an app that can generate a log file.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I did run it , but still not showing which files are using the 20GB
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I believe it is the pagefile.sys
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
How much disk space used it is reporting? It's right on top, below the filter.
It should be something like this: "C:\ - 95.3GB"
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Yes on the top it says 105 GB
right under it it shows the exchange using  about 65GB isn

on the bottom right pane, it shows all those small files under windows and their size, I also notice above  that pane, it shows paging file system about 24GB...which is the RAM size.....
I guess paging file system is not considered as part of Windows folder..

If I add the paging file system(about 24GB) to Windows folder and program files folder size, it will come around 105 GBs
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
OK, so you found your missing space. All is accounted there.

Now you have to check what you can shrink/move to another partition to solve your problem.

Hint: the page file can be moved to another disk/partition...
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Hint: the page file can be moved to another disk/partition...

How?
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
Control Panel > System > Advanced System Settings > Performance Settings > Advanced > Change
swap changeYou need the pagefile to be at least as big as your RAM. In your case, I think it's 24GB.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I see you can change the size of paging file, but how do you change the drive it should go to?
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
Click on C:, then on "No paging file", then on "Set". That will disable the paging file on C.

Click on another partition, then on "Custom Size" and set a size, or on "System managed size", then on "Set". That will create a pagefile on the partition you chose.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Ok...in my case it is grayed out , even though I logged in as Domain admin
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
According to this: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc737315(v=ws.10).aspx
you have to be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer.
The article is for Windows Server 2003 but it applies to 2008 also.

Note the "members of the Domain Admins group might be able to perform this procedure", which, in Microsoft talk means "probably not" :)

BTW, first set a new pagefile on another partition and then shrink/remove it from C, or Windows will complain.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Thank you Guys!
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