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Access 32-bit file in Access 64 bit, is this possible?

Posted on 2013-10-29
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Last Modified: 2013-10-29
Afternoon,

I am in the process of making something for my users in Access 2010 32-bit (Home Computer).

I figured I would work on it today on Access 2010 64-Bit (Office computer) and upon opening the .accde file I get a message saying it was built in a 32-bit version of Access and cannot be opened on my office computer.

I was able to finally open the file as a .accdb, but I am wondering if everything will still work as it should.

Is someone able to confirm this or advise how I can convert it to 64-bit without starting from scratch.

Regards,
N
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Question by:nobushi
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 250 total points
ID: 39609545
<<I was able to finally open the file as a .accdb, but I am wondering if everything will still work as it should.>>

 The answer is, "it depends".

 If you have not used any 3rd party controls, DLL's, or made any API call's, then it will work fine.   It could even be moved back to a 32 bit machine.

 If you do have things like that, then you'll need to make some modifications.   If API or DLL calls, then you can write the DB in such a way that they will work in 32 bit and 64 bit environments.

 With 3rd party controls however, you've got a problem.   In that case, you'd need to maintain two versions.

 It's actually best to avoid 64 bit Office at present, unless you need extremely large spreadsheets in Excel.  Even Microsoft still recommends the 32 bit version.

Jim.
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by:nobushi
ID: 39609589
Thank you for your response Jim.

Can you tell me why it is best to avoid 64-bit office, in relation to Access?
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ID: 39609606
<<Can you tell me why it is best to avoid 64-bit office, in relation to Access?>>

 It's not just in relation to Access, but all of Office.

 Basically it's the lack of 3rd party controls and software to work in conjunction with 64 bit Office.

 Right now, the only difference between the two is that the 64 bit addressing allows you to have extremely large spreadsheets in Excel.  Outside of that, 64 bit offers nothing else.

For 2010:
Choose the 32-bit or 64-bit version of Office
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/choose-the-32-bit-or-64-bit-version-of-office-HA010369476.aspx

For 2013, same story:
64-bit editions of Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee681792.aspx

Jim.
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by:Helen_Feddema
ID: 39609616
When I installed Office 2013 on a computer running 64-bit Windows, one of the installation dialogs (from Microsoft) advised installing the 32-bit version of Office.  Looks like they still haven't figured out this problem.
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by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 39609650
I'll help a bit. (No Points wanted)

When you "go up" to 64 bit development,  you cannot easily "go down" to 32 bit for users.
In other words: A 10 pound sack of flour(64 bit) cannot fit in a 1 pound bag(32 bit).
;-)

A lot of controls are specifically written for 64 bit applications and cannot run on 32 but apps.
So another analogy is that you cannot reliably run Access (32 bit) on a old 16 or 8 bit computer.

64 bit Access offers some benefits over 32 bit (Possible use of more memory, as a simple example), ...but the loss of compatibility often negates the advantage in most cases.

Like so many things in the world of computers, ...you should not upgrade until *everyone* will be upgraded to the same version, at pretty much the same time.


;-)
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Author Closing Comment

by:nobushi
ID: 39609712
Thanks much for all the explainations.
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