• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 837
  • Last Modified:

Date formatting problems with server regional settings

I have an application that consists of an Access 2010 FE with a SQL Server 2012 BE.  This application has been evolving over approximately 20 years, and has seen many different programmers, I am simply the current programmer.
The way that the program has been coded, requires users to have their short date format set to month/day/year, which Windows has declared to be US format (I am in Canada).  We also have the SQL Server login set to MDY.  We have a client that is experiencing a problem with the dates in the program, that we believe is caused by the following combination:
The date format on the server that is hosting the SQL Server is set to mm/dd/yy.  A 2 digit year.
The server interprets 2 digit years a being between 1900 and 1999.
This is causing formatting problems with some of the date fields throughout the program.  The program is using a four digit year in some places and a two digit year in others.  In some instances of the two digit year, it has the year correct as 2013, and in other locations, it interprets the two digit year as 1913.
I am wondering if there is a way to overcome this problem.  In the locations that the program is misinterpreting the date, I have tried to explicitly format to a four digit year, and that is not solving the problem.

1 Solution
Compare the 2 client machines.
Date and time settings control panel
Change date and time
Change calendar settings
Calendar: When a two-digit year is entered.
ZharphynAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I was not more clear.  I was wondering if there is a programmatic solution to the problem.  Is there a way that I can programmatically have the server computer return its short date format settings, and the date range it uses to translate a 2-digit year?  Is there a way that I can force the program to use a four digit year, when the server is using a 2-digit year?  I am trying to make the program work in all circumstances, or failing that, to provide feedback to the client telling them why their result sets are incorrect.

Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
try something like this in a query

select [datefield], cdate(iif(right([datefield],2) < "50", left([datefield],6) & "20" & right([datefield],2), left([datefield],6) & "19" & right([datefield],2))) as dteField
from tableX

adjust the value "50" as necessary, depending on the date values in your table.
Gustav BrockCIOCommented:
By default SQL Server 2012 does not use the date settings from the hosting server.
The default date format is yyyy-mm-dd.

Thus, it is more likely that the issue is how the front end writes the date values to the tables of SQL Server. Also, if you use and write values of data type Date, it has no format, only the value, thus such values can never fail.

So it looks like you need to debug the frontend for any improper SQL.
When you find some, we can tell you how to correct it.

To automate things, you need to understand the problem.
Are the 2 clients with different data sets, have the same date and time settings?
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

A proven path to a career in data science

At Springboard, we know how to get you a job in data science. With Springboard’s Data Science Career Track, you’ll master data science  with a curriculum built by industry experts. You’ll work on real projects, and get 1-on-1 mentorship from a data scientist.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now