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Is anyone using Microsoft Access 64 bit successfully

Posted on 2013-10-31
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Last Modified: 2013-11-09
This seems like an odd question, and I don't mean to be impertinent, but I seriously wonder - Is anyone using Microsoft Access (particularly 2013) successfully in 64 bit mode? I am an Access Developer so this is not a naive question.

If so, I'd like to know how and under what circumstances.  In the past the general advice (from all respected sources it seems) was to avoid 64 bit Access and use 32 bit instead.  I think a good portion of this had to do with problems when making API calls, but there may be other things too.  If so, I wonder how significant the problems are.  If they are not particularly significant, I am inclined to switch to Access 64 bit.  I seldom make API calls though I can think of a couple of instances where I need to get a computer name or name of a user.  I suppose, however, there are work-rounds.

Again,  is anyone using 64 bit Access successfully and happy with it?
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Question by:WoodrowA
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Dale Fye earned 1000 total points
ID: 39614355
I've found that many of the API calls have been tweaked to work with 64 bit Access, so other than putting some conditional compilation into those applications, that has not been a major problem for me.

There are also issues with ActiveX controls in the 64 bit Access.  I have one client that has both 32 and 64 bit systems, and they purchased 64 bit Offices because of one of the business intelligence systems recommended it.  My treeview controls don't work in that application.

My advice, unless you actually need the increased numeric processing (working with really large numbers) of Excel, stick with 32 bit Office.
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Assisted Solution

by:WoodrowA
WoodrowA earned 0 total points
ID: 39614397
@Fyed

Thank you for responding.

The only ActiveX code I use (that I remember) has to do with ADO. Does ADO fall under the "potential problems" category?  I do not write large applications involving numerous machines in a variety of environments.  As of now, what I write for others is controlled.  That is I have some say on the kind of machines being used and the software involved.

It is hard for owners of smaller companies to understand why they can't make use of the latest and greatest from Microsoft.  64 bit machines are all you can buy these days and the leader in the PC software industry is still Microsoft, and yet, hardly anyone is actually using 64 bit Access.  It will surprise me if I get many, if any, additional responses to my question.  

I suppose that alone should tell me something, but unless there is a good reason not to, given the kind of applications I write, I am inclined to at least consider a 64 bit solution.  Everyone naturally wants to install the latest version of Office in 64 bit mode.
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by:Dale Fye
Dale Fye earned 1000 total points
ID: 39614562
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LVL 58

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by:Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 500 total points
ID: 39614595
Besides what Dale posted, here's another Microsoft Technet article:

64-bit editions of Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee681792.aspx

 The issue with Office 64 bit edition is the lack of 3rd party controls, drivers, etc.

  API calls can be changed, and even written in such a way that the same Access DB can be used with either.

 But on the flip side, the 64 bit edition offers nothing feature wise other then having the ability to address a larger address space.  So you can have larger Excel spreadsheets and Project files and that's it.

  And as you will see from the articles, even Microsoft itself still recommends 32 bit version for most users because of those reasons.

Jim.
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LVL 21

Assisted Solution

by:Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP
Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP earned 500 total points
ID: 39615051
WoodrowA,

he only ActiveX code I use (that I remember) has to do with ADO.
ADO is not an issue.

Issues with ActiveX control is referring to controls that are not part of the standard/built-in controls installed with Access.  You will have to get the 64-bit version of the control. The problem is that there is a high chance that  there is not one available.

For all my apps that do can run in both 32/64 bit I will use conditional compiling to compile a MDE/ACCDE in both 32 and 64 bit. So far I have no need.

FWIW: I have yet to have a client install the 64-bit Office 2010 or 2013. Because of this I can't deploy a 64-bit Access MDE/ACCDE without using a VM.  

In my testing with Access 2010 64-bit I have yet to see any advantage to using the 64 bit version. Since you can't have Office 64 bit app and the Access 32 bit version installed the same Windows instance, that is the only reason I can find to use the Access 64-bit version. Just so it can co-exist with the other 64-bit Office apps.

If you decide to do all your Access apps in the 64-bit version then you will also be required to install the 64-bit version of all the other  Office apps in the same Windows Instance.

Note: I keep referring to the same Windows Instance because you can use a VM to install both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Office app on the same hardware in separate Windows Instances.
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Author Closing Comment

by:WoodrowA
ID: 39635449
Thank you all
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