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Microsoft Access Count records formula

Posted on 2013-10-31
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Last Modified: 2013-11-26
So I am running a report that I want to be able to count the records of a specific value in a column.

I need to have it return to me how many records have a negative number in the column and how many have a positive number on a access report. Would I do this in the query or would it be in the report?
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Question by:Keef4000
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 39615332
You can use a sum of Sgn([YourValueField])

I would do it in the report.

/gustav
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by:Keef4000
ID: 39615349
Ok, but I need to count how many records have a -1 in it then. How do I do that?
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 39615405
You are right. You have to filter for the sign, so Sgn is not needed:

SumofPlus: Abs(Sum([YourValueField]>0))
SumofMinus: Abs(Sum([YourValueField]<0))

/gustav
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Author Comment

by:Keef4000
ID: 39615429
does seem to work. States that there is an extra "(" in the expression but I don't see an extra one in yours or mine.
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by:Helen_Feddema
ID: 39615589
I think you need to do a Count, not a Sum, if the intention is to count how many positive and how many negative values there are.  Otherwise you get a sum of the values, which is different.
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by:mbizup
ID: 39615632
--->> I think you need to do a Count, not a Sum

Gustav (cactus_data) is correct... he's Summing the results of comparisons ... (boolean values: True/False,  0 and -1 respectively), which in effect gives you the *count* of records meeting those criteria.
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Author Comment

by:Keef4000
ID: 39622534
I tried his formula and it didn't work.
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 39626658
It does work. What did you do?

/gustav
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Author Comment

by:Keef4000
ID: 39667466
I tried these formula's and it didn't return a value

SumofPlus: Abs(Sum([YourValueField]>0))
SumofMinus: Abs(Sum([YourValueField]<0))
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Gustav Brock earned 500 total points
ID: 39668248
Did you replace YourValueField with the name of your field?

Or reverse it:

SumofPlus: Sum(Abs([YourValueField]>0))

/gustav
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