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Question on functionality of multiple antennas in one Wi-Fi router

Posted on 2013-11-03
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Last Modified: 2013-11-04
I have Ubiquity Bullet M2HP Wi-Fi acess point and it have only one external antenna. I may connect to this AP at max speed rate 65Mbps (802.11n). I guessed that is less than a passport value of this standart 150Mbps, because the Ethernet port throughput is only 100 Mbps for this device. Now I would like to buy a new router Linksys EA6700 that has 6 antennas and 1 gigabit WAN and 4 gigabit LAN. As specified it contains 3 antennas that are working on 802.11n(150Mbps) and 3 ones are on 802.11ac(450Mbps). Thereby total throughput=(3x150+3x450)=1800Mbps. But the question itself is in following:
Does this router will allow me to connect each of 6 devices to its own antenna to achieve the maximum perfomance of my wireless connections? If I am wrong about understanding the concept of 6 antennas, please explain me a fact of the matter!
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Question by:dmitrij75
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Dave Baldwin earned 450 total points
ID: 39620131
No, that's not the way it works.  There are two sets of three antennas.  One set for the 2.4GHz band and the other set for the 5GHz band.  The reason for using 3 antennas is to 'shape' the radio signal to give it more power in a particular direction.  The antennas are Not independent.  

There's a lot of 'marketing talk' in their specifications.  Wireless routers are 'time-share' devices.  When you have multiple devices connecting to them on one of the bands, they share the available time and bandwidth on that band.  You only have two bands on that router, 2.4GHz and 5GHz, so at any given instant, you only have two devices connecting to it.  But in the next millisecond it may be two other devices.

https://www.linksys.com/en-eu/products/routers/EA6700
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by:Michael-Best
Michael-Best earned 50 total points
ID: 39620285
Simply put, the maximum speed capable of the  Linksys EA6700 is rated at 150Mbps, this speed will never be reached even if only one Wi-Fi connection is used.
Multiple Wi-Fi connections share this maximum speed rated at 150Mbps, and thus each connection will use only a shared portion of the 150Mbps.
Extra antennas will give a larger Wi-Fi area range, and the Wi-Fi device(s) that has the better signal from the antennas will recieve (and may hog) more or most of the Wi-Fi speed.
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