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Networking question on home lab setup

Posted on 2013-11-03
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Last Modified: 2013-11-04
I'm trying to setup a home lab for VMware vSphere. My question is related to basic home lab networking or even plain networking. Again, this is not a VMware related question.

My ISP is Verizon, I have my desktop connected to the verizon router using an ethernet cable, which gave my desktop an ip address 192.168.1.x.

For my lab network I bought a HP V1910 Gigabit switch and plugged it into my verizon router. Sure enough, it received an ip address 192.168.1.y from the DHCP service on my verizon router and I made that static (see pic 1).

I then created four VLANs for traffic separation (see pic 2). I assigned each VLAN interface an IP addresses (see pic 3).

I installed VMware ESX on my HP server and gave that an IP address on VLAN 10 (see pic 4).

My question is, what exactly do I need to do in order to access my lab networks from my desktop ? Basically I want to be able to ping VLANs 172.21.10.x and 172.21.30.x  from my desktop network 192.168.1.x  so I can putty into ESX host, install vCenter, RDP into vcenter Windows Server and connect via VI client etc.


Pic 5 and 6 are the routing tables on my HP 1910 and Verizon Routers. I did not change anything here, except for trying to add a route on my Verizon router which shows "failed"

Can someone please help me understand how to make this happen ? If it's routes I need to add, then where and what exactly ?
Is there a best practice for Home Lab such as NAT or everything behind a firewall etc. I want to grow my lab environment, create a Windows Active directory domain, dhcp, dns service etc. I also want it to be secure.
1-HP-V1910-Management-IP.JPG
2-VLANs-for-vSphere-lab-environm.JPG
3-VLAN-Interface-Addresses.JPG
4-VMware-ESX-host-IP-address.JPG
5-HP-V1910-Route-Table.JPG
6-Verizon-Routing-Table.JPG
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Question by:verman09
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Expert Comment

by:Don Johnston
ID: 39620536
The problem is your (Verizon) router doesn't know about the new networks you've added.  If you can't add static routes for your new networks to the router, then you would have to NAT at the HP 1910.
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Author Comment

by:verman09
ID: 39620550
Thanks Don. In pic 6 you can see that Verizon router is allowing me to add routes, what do I need to add here exactly, the vlan interface address of the network I'm trying to reach ?

Also can you share the steps/procedure/commands to NAT on the HP 1910 ?

I read on some forums about virtual routing appliances (VMs) that can be leveraged for home labs, or even Microsoft Windows Server Routing Services. I need exact steps for anything that will allow me to ping the lab networks from my desktops.
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Don Johnston earned 500 total points
ID: 39620629
Sorry. Way too much information. :-)

Yes.  Add a routes on the router for each VLAN.

172.20.10.0/24 -> 192.1681.7
172.20.15.0/24 -> 192.1681.7
172.20.20.0/24 -> 192.1681.7
172.20.30.0/24 -> 192.1681.7
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Author Closing Comment

by:verman09
ID: 39623126
that worked, thanks.
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