Solved

HP DL385 G2 SAS HD Replacement

Posted on 2013-11-04
12
716 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-15
I discovered this morning that one of the 72Gb SAS drives on a HP DL385 G2 server is showing orange and diagnostics confirm that it has failed and been replaced by a hot spare (RAID 5 configuration). The SAS drive is hot plugable so I was planning to pop out the failed drive and replace it with another HP 72 Gb SAS drive from a server that I decommissioned a week ago. The replacement drive is not new and will probably still have RAID configuration /Partitioning information and data on it. Is there anything I need to do to the replacement drive to clear it before I swap it with the failed drive? or will the drive just get completely overridden when it is swapped in?
0
Comment
Question by:steve352
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • +1
12 Comments
 
LVL 37

Accepted Solution

by:
Gerwin Jansen earned 250 total points
ID: 39622456
To prevent issues, I'd be sure and empty the replacement drive. I believe this is the general advice when replacing faulty drives in a RAID system.

For example, from http://www.recover-raid.com/failed-RAID-help.html:
Test the subsystem's ability to recover from a drive failure. With all data backed up, remove one of the drives from the subsystem while it's running, and bring it back to full, undegraded operation using a blank hard drive replacement.
0
 

Author Comment

by:steve352
ID: 39622479
Any idea on how to blank/empty a SAS HD that was used in another server?
0
 
LVL 45

Assisted Solution

by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 250 total points
ID: 39622584
You should be able to wipe the drive by putting it in the server and configuring it as a single drive via the array config software.  That will format the drive.  When that's done, delete that drive's configuration and configure it as a hotspare.
0
 
LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 39622896
Q> Is there anything I need to do to the replacement drive?
A> plug it in hot, do not power down to swap. That way the controller will know to ignore what is currently written on it.
0
 

Author Comment

by:steve352
ID: 39624728
So here's what I ended up doing. I used the ACU to delete the logical drive and array that the replacement disk was part of. I then shutdown the server with the bad HD, swapped in the replacement drive, and powered the server back up. On boot up was prompted to rebuild disk (F1) or ignore (F2). Selected F1 - server booted up and disk rebuilt as the new hot spare. A little slow booting up while rebuilding was going on but fine after that. Thanks all for your help.
0
 
LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 39624914
You might have got away with it this time but you should never shut a server down to replace a disk if it supports hot-plug.
0
IT, Stop Being Called Into Every Meeting

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

 

Author Comment

by:steve352
ID: 39625234
Andy,

  I understand that hot-plug allows the drive to be replaced on the fly but some of the HP support documents say power off server and some don't. I thought that powering down to replace the failed drive was the more conservative (i.e. safer) option. Your comment seemed to imply that powering down the server wasn't the safest bet. Why do you say that?

Steve
0
 
LVL 37

Expert Comment

by:Gerwin Jansen
ID: 39625486
Why the B grade if I may ask?
0
 
LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 39626094
Powering down is less safe. You did probably erase the metadata by deleting the logical disk and array from the old box before taking the disk out as spare but what had that step not worked? The controller would have not known which disk had the real configuration and data on it and could have overwritten the wrong one. Swapping live guarantees the newly plugged in disk can be overwritten because it's obvious to the controller that the disk that is plugged in live is the replacement.

Any link to an HP support doc that says power down to fit a replacement disk? Never heard of that before except for the cheaper non-hot-plug chassis.
0
 

Author Comment

by:steve352
ID: 39651274
In the HP ProLiant G2 Server Maintenance manual (http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c00778876.pdf) under "Power down the server" in the Preparation Procedures it states "IMPORTANT: If installing a hot-plug device, it is not necessary to power down the server." "Not necessary" implies that leaving the server powered up is optional not mandatory. Later on in the Hot-Plug SAS HD procedure the only caution relates to running the server without a drive or blank inserted. Absolutely no mention of a requirement to leave the server powered up. Would have left server powered up if I had a sense that doing so was mandatory. I appreciate the explanation as to why I should have left it powered up. Thanks for that.
0
 

Author Comment

by:steve352
ID: 39651299
Gerwin - you and Craig contributed equally to give me a complete solution. Together they rate an "A". Maybe I don't understand all the intricacies of Experts-Exchange but I assuming "B" means good but incomplete solution.
0
 
LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 39651769
LOL, it does say that but it's under the generic "powering down the server" instructions which are immediately followed by the "Removing the server from the rack" instructions. Did you unrack it too ;)

For reference with ProLiants any "wine" (purple) coloured buttons/levers etc indicate hot-plug (although in the case of disks and PSUs there may not be a redundant one). If you take the lid off one day you can see that the fans can be replaced without shutting down as they have wine coloured handles. Blue levers on the other hand indicate cold-swap, so the PCI card locks are light blue on all but a few special servers.
0

Featured Post

6 Surprising Benefits of Threat Intelligence

All sorts of threat intelligence is available on the web. Intelligence you can learn from, and use to anticipate and prepare for future attacks.

Join & Write a Comment

The 6120xp switches seem to have a bug when you create a fiber port channel when you have a UCS fabric interconnects talking to them.  If you follow the Cisco guide for the UCS, the FC Port channel will never come up and it will say that there are n…
Usually shares are where we want them for our users and we tend to take them for granted. There are times, however, when those shares may disappear causing difficulty for your users. One of the first things to try is searching for files that shou…
Here's a very brief overview of the methods PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) offers for monitoring bandwidth, to help you decide which methods you´d like to investigate in more detail.  The methods are covered in more detail in o…
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…

762 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

19 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now