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connecting wireless Router

Posted on 2013-11-04
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Last Modified: 2013-11-08
I have one computer that does not have wireless card and it is connected directly with a cable to wireless router #1 in room#1.

in a separate room#2, I have another computer#2 that does not have a wireless card.

I have a wireless router#2 as a spare.

I wonder if wireless router#2 can get the signal from wireless router#1, then all I need to is plug network cable from wireless router#2 to computer#2 Nic?

Any help will be very much appreciated.

Thanks
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Question by:jskfan
11 Comments
 
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by:Fred Marshall
Fred Marshall earned 72 total points
ID: 39623425
Depends on the router.  What are the models?  Look for things like WDS.
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by:Emmanuel Adebayo
Emmanuel Adebayo earned 72 total points
ID: 39623528
Just like first expert said, it depend on the type of router you are using, but whatever the case you can bridging the router.

The article below will assist you set up the bridge.

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/ConfiguringTwoWirelessRoutersWithOneSSIDNetworkNameAtHomeForFreeRoaming.aspx
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Expert Comment

by:aamodt
ID: 39623542
Wireless meshing is the technology your router need to support for it to work.
You can do SSID roaming with same SSID, but you need a cable from router #2 to router #1.

But look up Meshing: https://www.google.no/#q=wireless+meshing
Should be some of those settings you need to look after.
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by:askincakir
askincakir earned 71 total points
ID: 39623908
Hi,

In your device you need to do BRIDGE configuration. Not all the Wireless AP devices support this. But vendors like Cisco are good enough for this.

Br,
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by:profgeek
profgeek earned 142 total points
ID: 39624028
You'd be better off just using some type of PowerLine adapters and just plugging the remote computer into it.  With a PowerLine adapter, you purchase a pair, plug one into a power outlet near your router and connect it to the router with an ethernet patch cable.  Then you locate the other unit anywhere convenient to your remote computer, plug it into the wall, and connect it to your remote computer with an ethernet patch cable.  They are increasingly inexpensive solutions that work quite well.

I use these all the times for situations where I can't run cable directly.  Here are some examples:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_9?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=powerline%20ethernet%20adapter&sprefix=powerline%2Caps%2C261
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by:jtru
jtru earned 71 total points
ID: 39624326
The easiest way to do this is to configure Router-2 as a client and connect it wirelessly to Router-1.  In this configuration, Router-1 will operate normally as a WiFi access point and a wired switch.  Router-2, as a client, simply connects via WiFi to Router-1, just like a laptop or tablet, except that it makes the connection available to its Ethernet switch ports.  

Some wireless routers may let you make a bridge connection, and some may let you select "repeater" mode, either of which should work.  There should be a "mode" selection where you can choose things like "access point", "bridge", "wifi client", and "repeater" (maybe).  

In Router-2 you need to select the access point to connect to (in this case, Router-1), the security (like WPA2), and the passphrase, just like you would for any client, except this applies to bridge and repeater modes as well.

Mesh is overly complex for what you want to do.  Powerline Ethernet can work fine, but you have to be careful how you hook it up.  For example, using a filtered outlet strip will block the signal, so you have to be plugged directly in to a wall outlet.  The powerline units I have (from the C company) block the other outlet, which is annoying.   It also takes a lot of trial and error to get it to link.  I would go with the WiFi client first, repeater second, and bridge third for your application.
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by:profgeek
profgeek earned 142 total points
ID: 39624497
I generally don't have a problem configuring the PowerLine devices if it's the original pair.  Adding a third device on the network often does require some trial and error.  Most of the newer units can be plugged in and still leave the other plug available.  While an extension cord will work, a surge protected power strip will not, so you would have to take care on your choices if you didn't want to plug a PowerLine adapter directly into a wall outlet.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39625029
it is Cisco router...I cannot remember the whole name for now since I am not home........
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Darr247 earned 72 total points
ID: 39625591
If it's actually a Cisco Linksys, see if it's listed at
http://dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Supported_Devices#Cisco
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39626053
yes I remember this :
DD-WRT
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Author Closing Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39634037
I will try it
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