VMWare / Linux  and /proc/cpuinfo

Posted on 2013-11-05
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2013-11-05
I created a VM with Linux on it

I set the cores to 1 socket and 5 cores

My machine is HT

I set the affinity to 0-9  (never did that before)

I start the OS and go to /proc/cpuinfo

I see only 5 processors.

I expected to see 10 processors as I asked for 5 physical cores on a HT system

What am I missing ?

Question by:Los Angeles1
  • 2
LVL 126

Accepted Solution

Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 1000 total points
ID: 39625268
How many did you assign in the VM settings? If you set 1 socket, 5 Cores, that's 5 vCPUs.

HT is only at the Physical!

If you want 10 vCPUs ?

either set 10 sockets, or 2 sockets, 5 cores.

Author Comment

by:Los Angeles1
ID: 39625354
What I want is 5 physical sockets

In other words, if I have HT on Intel and I have 10 cores.  I want half the available cores

5 physical cores, and 10 threads total

How do I get that ?
LVL 126
ID: 39625364
Is there any reason you want to assign specific cores?

why not just assign 5 vCPUs (sockets), and leave cores as 1.

five physical sockets, would be a 5 physical processor machine.

Assisted Solution

insidetech earned 1000 total points
ID: 39625399
VMware CPU resource controls are tightly integrated with the HT accounting.
It is probably best that you do not set the affinity and let the server figure out the CPU assignment.
This said, and as a example, if your physical system has 2 sockets with 1 core each and HT is supported, simply assign an equivalent in your VM to 4 single core CPU's.

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