Multinetting to route non-vlan traffic

Our telecom provider is utilizing VPLS to deliver traffic from two different internal networks (remote offices) to our headquarters (192.168.150.x and 192.168.160.x) using one physical cable.  They are only sending raw IP traffic - VLAN tagging is not supported.

I'm looking for programming instructions that will assign one port on an HP ProCurve 2600 to accept the VPLS traffic from both remote networks and send traffic bound for each network out it's own physical port to the upstream router (one port for 192.168.150.x and one port for 192.168.160.x).

Alternative ideas are welcome.  Thank you!
DetersLawAsked:
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Aaron TomoskyConnect With a Mentor SD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
I don't know if this is similar enough to help but here goes: I had an Internet connection with two distinct incoming ip ranges on one cable. My sonicwall was not happy with this. So I put that cable into a dumb layer two switch, then ran two cables from the same switch to my sonicwall. I programmed each interface seperately and it worked just fine.

Your router might not need any fancy seperation from the procurve, just two seperate cables which any old $50 switch can do just fine. Or I could be wrong and vlps is special and it won't work. But it's worth a try id think.
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harbor235Commented:
I would ask your VPLS provider again about vlan tagging, how else would they be able to send you traffic from two separate locations and networks without tagging the traffic?


And in that case you will need a sub-interface or trunk to terminate

harbor235 ;}
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harbor235Commented:
Multiple subnets can exist on the same wire that is not an issue. The question is how would a service provider deliver multiple networks on one wire. Because of the scale it would cripple their infrastructure.

They can deliver the networks via two wires and you could attach them to a single switch and vlan, but you have one wire

VPLS delivers typically Ethernet. Do you have a VPLS pt to pt service or a point to multi-point service?

Perhaps they thought you were connecting one network?


harbor235 ;-}
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DetersLawAuthor Commented:
Harbor235: I am waiting for the VPLS provider to confirm the circuit is passing VLAN tagging.  My feeling is that they aren't going to be able to provide tagging, so I'm getting started learning how someone might go about routing multiple networks from a single wire with tagging.  This is a multi-point service (two distant geographical locations are being sent to HQ on a single wire).  They flatly refused my request for two physical wires.

aarontomosky: Are you saying you think I could simply connect the single wire providing VPLS to a port on a layer 2 switch (no VLANs) and then connect that switch to my router using two cables; one port on the router configured for 150.x and one port for 160.x?
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
Yep. I'm no expert in low level network stuff but from what I understand and my past experience I think it should work.
Id use a small but decent quality switch so it doesn't slow stuff down, Don't share the switch with anything else as that might get weird. Last time I think I used gigabit netgear blue metal one and it was fast and stable.
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harbor235Commented:
Can you share who your provider is?


- harbor235 ;}
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DetersLawAuthor Commented:
It's regional project.  Cincinnati Bell/CBTS and Time Warner Telecom are partnering.
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DetersLawAuthor Commented:
Aarontomosky:  Turns out VPLS broadcasts all IP traffic along one cable.  We connected the VPLS feed to a HP ProCurve dedicated to the task of handline only VPLS traffic and programmed no VLANS - we are using only the default VLAN1.  We used multi-netting on the port for that VPLS connection adding one host address for each network plus another host address for management purposes.  Then we connected one cable from the VPLS switch for each network to our internal router.  Connectivity is now provided to our two remote locations via two physical connections and without the need for VLAN tagging.  No real drawbacks, other than having to dedicate a quality switch to the VPLS.  Thank you!
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
Great news! This is something that I think is frequently overcomplicated.
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harbor235Commented:
Hmm,

Multi-netting equates to secondary addressing which allows multiple subnets to exist on the same wire, I stated this on my second post.

"Multiple subnets can exist on the same wire that is not an issue. " 


The problem can arise with the number of hosts on a segment and the increased broadcast traffic, not sure why you would want to do this over a WAN, why not increase the network size?

Good luck,


harbor235 ;}
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