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IP Video Camera Feed to Monitors +- 30 meters

Say,

Background:
We have 6 monitors that need to display multiple cameras on these monitors - they are 42 inch. They have got DVI or VGA inputs or other - we want to mount a server that powers these monitors about 25 - 30 meters away from where they are on the wall. We want to put 6 video cards into the server to display the IP pictures on these monitors so therefore we need to know what technology we need to use to connect the monitors to the video cards between 20 - 30 meters cable run.

Question:
We are in a position to buy any monitors although we are looking at low cost 42 inch monitors, & we are also looking to buy any video card. Note that the feed is from IP cameras - quality of image may not be good/high quality.

So what technology you suggest we use considering this distance? (25 - 30 meters)

TX?
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shaunwingin
Asked:
shaunwingin
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3 Solutions
 
Steven HarrisPresidentCommented:
DVI or VGA should be fine.  I run 13 IP cameras to a desktop unit, which runs the feed to 2 Monitors over 200 feet away (about 60 meters) using DVI cables.  Image quality is fine although slightly delayed (~1-2 sec).
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shaunwinginAuthor Commented:
Are there any boosters required for the DVI cable?

I'm aware of a 3rd type of Video card connector (newer). What would this be called and what are the options of using this?
What is HDMI?
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Steven HarrisPresidentCommented:
Are there any boosters required for the DVI cable?
I am running FiberOptic DVI-D cables, so I am not using a repeater.  You also need to consider video card ability, monitor resoltion and some other factors.

Just FYI - 20 meters of DVI-D FO is roughly $500.

I'm aware of a 3rd type of Video card connector (newer). What would this be called and what are the options of using this?
There are many types of video cards and connectors.
VGA (DE-15 variant)
DVI (replacing VGA)
Mini-DVI
Micro-DVI
DMS-59 (dual DVI)
ADC (Apple Display Connector)
Mini-VGA (Apple and Sony PCs)
DisplayPort (proposed to replace DVI)
Mini DisplayPort (successor to Mini-DVI)
HDMI

What is HDMI?
High-Definition Multimedia Interface - the digital replacement to most analog standards.

What it is going to boil down to is - the budget ans complete project specs:

How much are you willing to spend?
Is this a permanent solution?
What is the expected outcome? (quality/presentation)
What are the conditions of use? (environment)
What are the installation details? (exposed cables, wall/ceiling runs)
What is the time-frame for project completion?

Just to give you some further perspective:
50 ft (non FO) DVI is typically acceptable for 1280x1024 resolution (19" monitor).  For 100' runs (about $80 -construction grade) , you are looking at $150 per repeater which is about $1400 + video cards + monitors, etc.

Higher quality (not necessarily higher price) HDMI cables in 50' are acceptable with compliant devices. For 100' runs (about $240-construction grade), you are looking at $50 per extender, which is about $1750 + video cards + monitors, etc.

Another option is to go the very cheap and temporary -although possibly harder to accomplish due to product availability- route and go with component connections.  For example, using 'TV Out' compliant video cards, component adapters and component video cables...  Total cost for cables for 6 runs and adapters would be about $500 + video cards + monitors, etc.
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shaunwinginAuthor Commented:
Tx. I have been told that one can run HDMI over cat 6 ethernet cable. Have you heard of this?

We are running this cable indoors and the max. distance for 4 of the monitors is 30 meters and for 2 on 15 meters. We want 42" LED monitors (cheap ones).

What can you recommend?
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shaunwinginAuthor Commented:
PS we don't need any sound only video
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SelfGovernCommented:
Here's what I'm wondering: If the cameras are IP cameras, why not keep the signal going over Ethernet until it gets to the computer, which you will now set up close to where you want the monitors to be?   No worries about length of video cables, etc... just use a standard 6' or 20' cable, and you're done,

The technology for getting an Ethernet signal from A to B, if necessary including using a cheap Ethernet switch, is known, proven, and cheap.  The same can't be said about the video output of a computer graphics card.

Or am I missing something?
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
I agree with SelfGovern. most modern machines can do HD quality fine and a small system per screen maybe using a iSCSI backend will solve your problem
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Darr247Commented:
Also, up to ten 100Mbps cameras should be able to connect to a gigabit switch with all of them then having simultaneous full bandwidth paths to the computer or DVR if that computer/DVR has a gigabit network adapter.

HDMI carries both uncompressed high definition digital video and digital audio, by the way... that may not have been completely clear in the description previously provided.
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shaunwinginAuthor Commented:
My main concern is lightning strikes - pls address this issue.
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Darr247Commented:
NOTHING will protect your equipment from a direct lightning strike (i.e. to your service drop or lines at your building).
It's no problem buying insurance for such an event, because that happening is so rare.

If it hits on the other side of your service's transformer, surge protectors, a service-panel-mounted lightning arrestor and good grounding (or "earthing" in some countries) array should help... but the greater the distance away the strike is, the better your mitigation measures will function.

The greatest cause of equipment damage I see is branches falling on service drops causing either pole of 2-pole single phase service to touch the grounded Neutral, which then puts 240 volts to half the circuits in the building (instead of 120V).
 
(I am a state-licensed electrician, by the way.)

edit: maybe I should qualify that first statement. NOTHING (affordable) will protect your equipment from a direct lightning strike. You could put in a whole-building UPS where the incoming power simply charges batteries, then the batteries run an inverter or inverters that supply the service panel[s] with AC.  Then a direct strike would just wreck the battery charger[s] (and possibly some batteries), which would then need to be replaced. But putting in all that would cost more than replacing all the equipment you're trying to protect, >99.5% of the time.
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