Solved

Use variable stored in mysql database

Posted on 2013-11-14
8
297 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-15
I'd like to store a variable inside a mysql database.  Then assign that variable a value after it's pulled from the database.

Here's a very basic example of how I'm storing the info in the database.

**********************
echo "name" . $var_lname; Thanks for registering for Momentum 2014. **********************

I can pull the text from the database, but $var_fname comes out as plain text and not the value assigned to the variable in the code.

Here's example code.

try {
	$get_email_text = new PDO("database information");
    foreach($get_email_text->query("Query here") as $row) {
		$var_email_text = $row['email_text'];
    }
    $get_email_text = null;
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    print "Error!";
    die();
}

$var_lname="Steve";
echo $var_email_text;

Open in new window


Instead of replacing the variable $var_lname with "Steve" I get the exact text that's in the database...

**********************
echo "name" . $var_lname; Thanks for registering for Momentum 2014.
**********************

Any ideas on how to tell PHP that $var_lname is a variable?

Thanks,

Steve
0
Comment
Question by:stkoontz
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
8 Comments
 
LVL 110

Expert Comment

by:Ray Paseur
ID: 39649565
This seems to be a templating issue.  Try this function:
http://php.net/manual/en/function.str-replace.php
0
 
LVL 83

Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 39649582
If you included $var_lname; in the text in the database, the answer is no, it is Not a PHP variable, it is just text.  Your code is doing exactly what it is supposed to do.

Variables must be in the PHP source code, not in the database.  When a PHP page is requested, the first thing that happens is the PHP interpreter "pre-compiles" the source code including the variables.  Since the database content is not part of that, it does not get "pre-compiled" into the program.  You can assign data fetched from the database into PHP variables that have already been defined.

Try this in place of line 13 to see what happens.

echo $var_lname.' '.$var_email_text;

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 43

Accepted Solution

by:
Chris Stanyon earned 500 total points
ID: 39649724
You could potential store your own version of a variable in the database, and then when you pull out the record, do a str_replace or regex on it.

Another alternative, but probably less robust is to store it in a format that printf would understand. Store this:

%s, thanks for registering for Momentum 2014.

And then when you pull it out of the database, output it like this:

$var_lname="Steve";
printf($var_email_text, $var_lname);

Open in new window

Using the printf function will replace the %s with the value stored in $var_lname
0
How our DevOps Teams Maximize Uptime

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us. Read the use case whitepaper.

 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:loki0609
ID: 39650502
What your looking for is the eval function.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.eval.php
0
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:Chris Stanyon
ID: 39650620
@loki0609 - read the first line of that page:

The eval() language construct is very dangerous because it allows execution of arbitrary PHP code.

Storing PHP code in a database and then running eval() on it is a nightmare waiting to happen - Don't do it!!
0
 
LVL 110

Expert Comment

by:Ray Paseur
ID: 39650931
To quote Rasmus: If eval() is the answer, you're almost certainly asking the wrong question!
0
 
LVL 2

Author Closing Comment

by:stkoontz
ID: 39651190
Using %s in the database so printf understands it works great.  I tweaked it a bit and found sprintf to store the string into a variable so I can email it out.

$var_text=sprintf($var_email_text, $var_fname)

Thanks!

Steve
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:loki0609
ID: 39651593
eval is completely fine to use in the right circumstances. If the input is controlled and trusted, like a database of "templates" that you created that don't have output from outside then it's fine. It's used quite a bit in templating systems
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Part of the Global Positioning System A geocode (https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/geocoding/) is the major subset of a GPS coordinate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System), the other parts being the altitude and t…
These days socially coordinated efforts have turned into a critical requirement for enterprises.
Explain concepts important to validation of email addresses with regular expressions. Applies to most languages/tools that uses regular expressions. Consider email address RFCs: Look at HTML5 form input element (with type=email) regex pattern: T…
The viewer will learn how to look for a specific file type in a local or remote server directory using PHP.

726 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question