Windows 2008 licensing

Hi Everyone,

I would like to know how windows server/cal licensing work.

When we buy laptops/desktops from Dell, which is OEM, does that mean a network CAL automatically comes with it or do I still need to buy a separate license?

Thanks.
susancarruthAsked:
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davorinCommented:
With laptop/PC comes let say windows 8 license, so you can run windows 8 on that computer.
If you want to run windows server OS on the server, you need windows server license.
If you want to access windows server resources/services with laptop/PC than you need windows server CAL (Client Access License) for that PC.

So if you want to access any services on that server (AD authentication, file server, print server,..) you need a windows server CAL i.e. a separate license.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Server CALs have not existed since Windows 2000.

No version of Windows sold today (or in the last 10 years) includes a device or user CAL to access the server.  Those are sold separately.  Even if you buy a volume license or software assurance, you STILL need to buy CALs.  Which CALs you get depends on how your business and users work but in MOST cases, the CHEAPER solution is to get USER CALs since many users these days have multple devices that may be used to access the company network.  Further, the END POINT device is what requires the CAL when licensing by device CAL.  Meaning if you had a user accessing company resources from a computer at a public library and you had licensed ONLY by device, then you would need to buy a device CAL for that public library computer.  HOWEVER, if the user has a CAL, than that user can access the network from anywhere with no additional CALs required (and to be further clear, that no additional CALs only refers to basic networking.  If you want your user to access an RDS server, a SQL server, an Exchange server, etc, then you need those additional CALs (CALs are ALMOST ALWAYS Additive and do not replace the need for other CALs (if you wanted to use all those services, Microsoft has sold an Enterprise CAL in the past that could replace all those CALs (NOT CHEAP) but I don't know if they still have it.

And finally, keep in mind, any licensing advice offered here is a best effort - the only person/people you should begin to trust is the license granting authority - Microsoft in this case.  "They told me on experts exchange" will not hold up in an audit/lawsuit as a valid defense.
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susancarruthAuthor Commented:
Thanks for explaining.
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