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Windows XP   - Resizing the C drive.

Posted on 2013-11-18
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Last Modified: 2013-11-25
I have a windows XP PC that's got the following drives  -  

C - 7GB MAX

D-  60 GB MAX

Whats the best way to resize the C drive? The PC is a domain PC.
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Question by:APC_40
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by:Ahnassi
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Acronis Disk Director
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by:APC_40
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Is this a free utility?
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by:rindi
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Any partition manipulation utility will do. For example there is GParted, an OpenSource liveCD. Just make sure your backup is OK before starting:

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=08156
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by:Darr247
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If D: is empty, delete that partition with Disk Management, then 'expand' the C: partition.
No external utilities are required.
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by:Mahesh
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You must use 3rd party utilities such as Norton pation magic OR PQMagic to make this hassle free since this is Win XP

[Illegal CD deleted, rindi, EE Topic Adviser]
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by:frankhelk
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EASEUS Partition Manager would do well. For free, as far as I remember.

Install, start, schedule the following actions

- Shrink D: to i.e 50 GB (depends on desired amount to swap and usage on D:)
- Expand C: to i.e. 17 GB
- Let it run (would require a reboot, the actions would be performed while booting)
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by:nobus
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i always use Bootit-BM for this (free for partition work)  www.terabyteunlimited.com/       
download it and make the cd - boot from it
do NOT install it to disk - hit cancel
now select partition work -  then your disk - and click resize
that's it -  if you have free space next to the C drive

if not, you first have to resize the D: partition to free up space, and slide this to the end of disk, to make the free space next to the c drive
so - originally your disk looks like :
CCCCDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
you resize the D: - so it looks like CCCCDDDDDDDDDDDDFFF   (FFF= free space)
now select slide (on the D: drive) and move it to the end of disk - then it look s like :
CCCCFFFDDDDDDDDDDDDD

and now click on your C: drive to resize it
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lionelmm earned 500 total points
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You may also want to consider cloning it onto a bigger drive. Not exactly what you asked, "how to resize" but in a way it is. If you clone it to another larger drive you can get more space for both C and D. I highly recommend clonezilla Clonezilla Live--free and easy to use. I use all the defaults and works perfectly 99% of the time.
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Author Closing Comment

by:APC_40
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ended up cloning the drive - cheers
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