Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 168
  • Last Modified:

Virtualizing the DC

I was wondering if I can get some feedback in regards to Virtualizing the Domain Controller.

I was told by some that Virtualizing ALL the DC's is not a good idea and that its best practice to have one PHYSICAL Domain Controller available just incase. Some say that virtualizing a DC and not have any PHYSICAL Domain Controller is not an issue as long as there is fault tolerance and the virtual hard drive file is accessible.

Any insight would be greatly welcomed.
0
Geekah
Asked:
Geekah
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
1 Solution
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
We do not have any physical Domain Controllers any more, and most of our clients no longer have any physical domain controllers.

Some clients, do like to prefer to be able to "touch and stroke" their DCs.

see here also

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2010/06/10/how-to-virtualize-active-directory-domain-controllers-part-1.aspx

What you must not do, if you use snapshots, for patch management, is rollback or Revert a DC using snapshots, but we think this is common sense, but Virtual Admins seem to forget this!
0
 
pony10usCommented:
This is an ongoing point of contention within the IT community. There are points that suggest that either option is better than the other.

Personally, I prefer to keep one ADDC as a physical server just in case the VM host that houses any other ADDC's goes down. Others will say that to combat that you should keep multiple ADDC's on separate VM servers. Also, if the ADDC is located in the same physical location as the VM Host and there is a disaster (fire/flood/etc) then if it was a virtual and you had a backup it would be quicker to recover.

There are some that say it is a security risk to have an ADDC virtualized at all. Someone could get a copy of the VM and then have all the time they want to Brute Force attack it.

Again, it really comes down to your doing a full risk assessment and deciding on which risks are more acceptable and proceeding down that path.

Good luck and I'm sure there will be more informative responses to your inquiry.

You may also want to look at this:  http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/the-enterprise-cloud/considerations-for-virtualizing-all-active-directory-domain-controllers/

Some very good information in the comments at the end.
0
 
Handy HolderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Had a client who setup their iSCSI and NFS targets using DNS rather than IP addresses, then they virtualized all their DCs which were also their only DNS servers. Oh what fun that was to get started again after a power-cut.
0
Free Backup Tool for VMware and Hyper-V

Restore full virtual machine or individual guest files from 19 common file systems directly from the backup file. Schedule VM backups with PowerShell scripts. Set desired time, lean back and let the script to notify you via email upon completion.  

 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Bottom line is you need to plan this.

First, what virtualization platform are you using?  VMWare or Hyper-V or something else?

If Hyper-V, are the Hyper-V servers joined to the domain?  If so, even though in 2012 you're supposed to be able to remove all physical DCs, I'd still prefer a physical.

Otherwise, you can be all virtual... PROVIDED you do things intelligently to accommodate that decision (see andyalder's comment).

You also have to plan security appropriately.  pony10us suggested an attacker could copy a VM... true... but if you use virtualization at all (and even if you don't), if a hacker can gain access to the network and a domain admin account, they could create a VM DC copy of a physical DC so I don't think that's a valid individual concern - that's more of a plan your security concern... what could someone do...
0
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
as an aside, we are seeing more and more larger clients, move DNS away from Windoze now, so DNS and AD are not tied!

So AD can still start because it has a depedancy on good working DNS! (e.g. DNS and AD are no the same server!) e.g. Infoxblox to name one product! Strange because one upon a time, Sun Solaris provided DNS, and then migrated to Novell - Microsoft, and now back again!
0
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The DC running DNS has never been a requirement.  It's been a STRONG suggestion as AD required dynamic DNS and in most environments you don't have a huge mix of systems.  The most important thing is that WHATEVER server(s) run DNS, they need to be able to store and return to the clients upon request, service records about where AD resources are located.

In most environments, having the DC(s) as your DNS server(s) is still the most logical thing and for most people here, they shouldn't even consider NOT having DNS hosted by the DC (in my opinion).
0
 
Handy HolderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
>as an aside, we are seeing more and more larger clients, move DNS away from Windoze now, so DNS and AD are not tied!

It was more a generic warning against migrating a core service that virtualization relies on to a virtual platform rather than a poke at Windows. If they had virtualized all their Linux based DNS servers the same problem would have occurred - they virtualized something that virtualization relied on.
0
 
GeekahAuthor Commented:
thanks everyone
0

Featured Post

Automating Your MSP Business

The road to profitability.
Delivering superior services is key to ensuring customer satisfaction and the consequent long-term relationships that enable MSPs to lock in predictable, recurring revenue. What's the best way to deliver superior service? One word: automation.

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now