Solved

Office Network Issue

Posted on 2013-11-20
26
629 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-12
Dear all,

I have a office I leased from a virtual office. In this office, they have provided us with 4 network ports on the wall, which is linked to their network. This 4 network ports, we use for:

1. admin pc 192.168.128.18
2. finance pc 192.168.128.19
3. network printer 192.168.128.20
4. wireless router - ASUS RT-N66 brand

The wireless router is configured to 192.168.1.254.

My boss and the moving laptops uses the wireless network so their IPs are all 192.168.1.x.

Problem: They can't locate the network printer on 192.168.128.20.

Question: How do I get them to print to the network printer and be on the same network as 192.168.128?

Thank you!
0
Comment
Question by:sharepoint2013
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • +5
26 Comments
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:mattclarified
ID: 39662212
Hi,

You will have to get the company that provide your leased network to put a route on their router to route traffic to the printer, or, set the wireless router up so that it uses the 192.168.128.x network and gives out addresses on that range.

M@
0
 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39662216
You should be able to connect a LAN port on the Wireless router to the office network, give it static IP address of (I think) 192.168.128.21 (as noted above) and then turn DHCP OFF on the wireless router. Now it should be an extension of the office network and people on wireless should see the printer.

... Thinkpads_User
0
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
uniqueinfotech earned 500 total points
ID: 39662218
What you want to be plugged into the 4th port is a Wireless Access Point, or a Switch, which basically acts like a multitab for the network which will allow all devices to be on the 192.168.128.x network. A router on the other hand will attempt to create it's own network by assigning a different network address (IE 192.168.1.x) which makes things more complex.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mattd_br
ID: 39662258
My question is whether they limit the number of IP's you can use in the 192.168.128.x network.  If it's only 3 or 4, then you can't have wireless clients on the same subnet.  If it's more (ie. the entire subnet range), then configuring the router as a WAP would be the best approach.

If limited to a certain number of IP addresses; are there other resources on the 192.168.128.x network you must access or is it?  Is there inbound traffic routed to these devices?

Maybe easiest to use LAN ports on the router for the admin and finance PC's and network printer.  Everything would end up on the 192.168.1.x network and be routed twice (through the wireless router and then again through the router the virtual office has you connected to).
0
 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39662386
If you have a number of moving laptops, it might be easiest to get more office IP addresses if you can.

Otherwise, give the wireless network a different subnet and get a small wireless printer for the roaming folk. That will be quite simple to do.

.... Thinkpads_User
0
 

Author Comment

by:sharepoint2013
ID: 39662740
how do i make the wireless router perform like a switch, to grab IPs from 192.168.128
0
 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39662776
Hook it up LAN port to network as I described. Then go to the LAN settings of the wireless router and set the IP address to 192.168.128.21 (I think).

Before you start this, you need to check with the Landlord how many IP addresses you may use.

.... Thinkpads_User
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:uniqueinfotech
ID: 39662969
sharepoint2013, you can try to disable DHCP on the router LAN side and set it to automatically acquire IP from the WAN side, failing that, manually configure the devices on the LAN side to have an IP of 192.168.128.x
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:Infamus
ID: 39663288
Here's what I would suggest.

                                               WAN                  LAN 5-Ports
Wall-----------------------------------Wireless Router-----------------------------------------Clients
                                  192.168.128.18         192.168.1.1         DHCP 192.168.1.5 - 192.168.1.100

1. admin pc 192.168.1.101
2. finance pc 192.168.1.102
3. network printer 192.168.1.103

In this case, you are only using one of the IP's provided by the building.

Let me know if you have any questions.
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39663648
I agree with the solution suggested by infamus.  Here is a diagram:

You might envision the host company's network as one of the upper routers and your router as one at the bottom of the cascade.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mattd_br
ID: 39663658
Seems half of these responses have all suggested the same thing, mine included.  Author needs to pick one and run with it.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sharepoint2013
ID: 39666909
@infamus i can't control the IP given by the network ports of the building i.e. its dhcp and it gets IPs of 192.168.128.x
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:Infamus
ID: 39666963
Then you can set WAN port of the Wireless router to "DHCP" instead of static.

The whole idea is to provide access to your LAN resources.
0
Highfive Gives IT Their Time Back

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39667324
Using the WAN port and DHCP on the WAN port puts you back to the start with an entirely different roaming network.  So you will, in the case, have to get another printer for the new subnet.

.... Thinkpads_User
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:Infamus
ID: 39667340
Printer will be connected to the LAN port of the wireless router so it stays on the same subnet as moving(wireless) lapops and other devices.
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39667365
Here is the diagram I mentioned above:

So, you plug the WAN port of your router into the wall with DHCP so it gets one of the addresses from the host company.  You get one IP address from them here.

Then, you plug everything else into the LAN side of your router with DHCP turned on.
Everything on *your* LAN gets IP addresses from your router.

Your computers should be able to see computers on the host subnet if they allow that.
They will certainly see the internet gateway and have internet access.
Multiple-Subnets.pdf
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:Infamus
ID: 39667389
@fmarshall

I was wondering where the diagram was....  LOL

This is exactly what I was saying, except the "public/guest wifi" part.
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:mattclarified
ID: 39667402
Hi, from the information provided it seems your building provide you with IP addresses from 192.168.128.1 to 192.168.128.254
On your wireless router, you will need to set it's IP to 192.168.128.250, it's subnet to 255.255.255.0 and it's gateway to the gateway of the buildings router. Do an ipconfig on one of your PC's to find this out.
On your wireless router you will need to disable DHCP.
When wireless devices connect to the wireless router, the DHCP request will bypass the wireless router and obtain one from the building router on your network range.
You will then be able to access the devices on your network as required
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39667639
I hope we can be clear on this:

Either, the "building" has given you a set of IP addresses to use but we don't know, from what you've said, how many there are.  
- one conjecture is that you have 192.168.128.18 through .20 and one more and they are all static with no DHCP service provided and you have to set the gateway and DNS server addresses manually for things plugged into those 4 ports.

OR
- another conjecture is that you get a small DHCP range but we don't know where it starts or ends.
- another conjecture is that you get a full 253 addresses via DHCP from the building (saving one for the DHCP server on their side), so you get maybe 192.168.128.2-192.168.128.254.  This is similar to what mattclarified alludes to I believe.

We just don't know because you haven't told us yet.  But that's OK.

If you have an adequate range of IP addresses provided from the "building" via DHCP then:
- you don't need a DHCP server on your side unless you want it.  But, if you do, then you need a NATting router WAN/LAN setup.
- your wireless router can be set up as a simple switch (see diagram here) with DHCP on the LAN side disabled.

If you don't have an adequate range of IP addresses provided from the "building" via DHCP or any other means then this means:
- set up a router on your side with NAT.
- set the router WAN up according to what they provide you (i.e. via DHCP or static)
(gateay and DNS too).
- set up the router LAN however you want as long as it's different from and doesn't include 192.168.128.0/24.
Wireless-Router-as-a-Simple-Swit.pdf
0
 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39668008
@sharepoint2013  - I assumed you only had 4 IP addresses. Please do clarify that.  

If you plug the WAN port of the wireless router into your office network, it will be isolated from the office printer, so you would need a second printer.

If you cannot set a static IP, that makes hooking everything up together more difficult (but still do-able).

What does the Landlord say about this. They may think you have a specific number of devices and are not providing more than you are paying for.

... Thinkpads_User
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 39669761
I believe some of those companies charge per computer that requires internet access. You really need to talk to their people and see what you can do within their confines. If you guys are renting from Regus, I know their IT is in Asia. All the office staff can do is send a request through an electronic system and wait for those folks to respond. Does that company offer wireless to begin with? If so, then it's pointless for you to get a wireless router.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sharepoint2013
ID: 39696237
Can i say that i should configure my wireless router IP to 192.168.128.254
0
 
LVL 90

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 39696245
You can try that - it should work. But you may need to work with the landlord to make certain.

.... Thinkpads_User
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 39697576
You never did cite what the IP address of the wireless router is to begin with. But also, you might have more computers online that what's allowed.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sharepoint2013
ID: 39701953
@masnrock 192.168.1.254.
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 39702486
Is that the wan address of the router?
0

Featured Post

Free Trending Threat Insights Every Day

Enhance your security with threat intelligence from the web. Get trending threat insights on hackers, exploits, and suspicious IP addresses delivered to your inbox with our free Cyber Daily.

Join & Write a Comment

The Cisco RV042 router is a popular small network interfacing device that is often used as an internet gateway. Network administrators need to get at the management interface to make settings, change passwords, etc. This access is generally done usi…
Before I go to far, let's explain HA (High Availability) and why you should consider it.  High availability is the mechanism used to provide redundancy to any service at the same site and appears as a single service to the users of that service.  As…
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…

708 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

16 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now