Charset specified in a meta tag

The following resources have a character set specified in a meta tag. Specifying a character set in a meta tag disables the lookahead downloader in IE8. To improve resource download parallelization, move the character set to the HTTP Content-Type response header.

I am using the following code: <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />

How do I move this to my server or place it in response header.
livewirewebsolutionsAsked:
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Big MontyConnect With a Mentor Senior Web Developer / CEO of ExchangeTree.org Commented:
assuming apache, add to your .htaccess file in root directory:

AddDefaultCharset UTF-8
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Ray PaseurConnect With a Mentor Commented:
IE8 (eight?)

I would recommend that you use the HTML5 doctype, like this, and do browser detection.  If any of your clients are still using IE8, you can put a notice on the screen with a link to the current browsers!

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html dir="ltr" lang="en-US">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8" />
...

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livewirewebsolutionsAuthor Commented:
Hi Ray,

but I heard you are supposed to avoid a charset in the meta tag?
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Ray PaseurCommented:
These are the first 3 lines from Facebook (so it can't be that big an issue)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en" id="facebook" class="no_js">
<head><meta charset="utf-8" />

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The issue that some have been critical of has been the placement of a character-set tag deep into the document.  In theory, UTF-8 is self-evident, but many browsers will re-request the document if they encounter a character-set tag to be sure they are using the right encoding.  I think any associated performance issues are very, very small, perhaps unmeasurable.
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livewirewebsolutionsAuthor Commented:
What about using it in the htaccess file?
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Ray PaseurCommented:
I don't see anything wrong with that.  The central issue is consistency across all encoding of the data.  You may find a global default character set configuration for the HTTP server, which in theory could be (slightly) more efficient than .htaccess settings.

Here is what W3 has to say: "...information in the HTTP header overrides information in the document itself."
http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-htaccess-charset.en

If you wanted to serve some pages in UTF-8 and some in ISO-8559-1, you would probably not want to use .htaccess, but if you know you're only working with one encoding you'll be OK either way.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I have seen a couple of questions where the server was sending a UTF-8 content type header that was totally confusing the user.  There is an awful lot of content that is in ISO-8859-x character set.  Changing the character set directive does Not change the actual character codes so you end up with a page that has question marks usually in black diamonds where the browser doesn't know what to show for that code.  One of those places is the Apache web server docs.
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