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Verizon wireless WPA passcode

Posted on 2013-11-25
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Last Modified: 2013-11-25
Someone from Verizon (FIOS) told one of my clients that if they changed their WPA passphrase from what they had set it to, they would lose their wireless speed, or the speed of the wireless connection would be lowered.

They gave them a passcode of 16 characters containing letters & numbers that obvious means nothing & they have to keep it written down to give to others that would like to use it while visiting. This is a home not an office.

My question is what this Verizon rep told them true (I can find nothing thru Google about it), & is it just the fact that they need to use a 16 character or larger passcode?

I know it is "recommended" that you use a 12-16 character passphrase, but is your wireless speed affected by the length of it??

Thanks!
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Question by:Blinkr
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by:CorinTack
CorinTack earned 150 total points
ID: 39675256
No, the length of your wireless password has no impact on the speed of your wireless connectivity. The only time your PC/laptop/mobile device uses the password is when authenticating initially with the wireless device, so after that (when you are actually using the device for connectivity) it will have no effect.
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by:Darr247
ID: 39675328
You should use WPA2/AES authentication/encryption in home situations.
That adds zero overhead so does not reduce wireless throughput.

If you use WPA/TKIP instead, the password vectors are included in every packet which does reduce throughput for 802.11a, 802.11g and 802.11b.

If you have an 802.11n wireless router/AP, WPA2/AES is required; if you set it to use WPA/TKIP instead, 802.11n will be disabled and it will fall back to 802.11g (and 802.11a if it's a dual-band device). Perhaps THAT is the situation to which the tech was referring.

Passphrases consisting of a combination of letters, numbers and symbols (like !@#$%) at least 8 characters long are recommended for preventing dictionary and brute force hacking attempts.
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McKnife earned 150 total points
ID: 39675801
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