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Changing network configurations because of changing from dsl to cable

we are going to change the internet connection from dsl to cable, the server runs on sbs03, 2 modems, and 1 static ip address.  Are there any changes I have to do when changing to the cable? and how to do that, details please?  there are about 15 computers on the network.  Do I have to turn off all computers at the time?

Thanks in advance.
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eidee
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eidee
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3 Solutions
 
tsaicoCommented:
It depends, but usually this is fairly straight forward and there is a chance that you will not have to change anything.

Your gateway (firewall) will be the one to change ISP WAN IPs, but your internal can stay the same. How is your current network configured?

Usually in this case, you would just change the WAN IP on the firewall and leave your internal subnets the same.  No internal reconfigure needed, as usually the gateway is the only that needs to be updated to reflect new ISP/
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
The DSL Router had an Ethernet port that plugged into your server correct?

What are the two modems used for?

Does the server have two network adapters?

Where do the computers get DHCP/DNS from?

Does your server run DHCP and DNS?

IS your Server a Domain Controller?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
I would think the "2 modems" are telephone modems for fax or ... ?

The main thing is likely configuring the new cable modem/router so that the internal LAN subnet is the same as what you have now.  Later on, this could be inconvenient if someone does a "reset" on the modem/router.

If all of the computers get their addresses via DHCP from the current modem/router then it's pretty easy and you would leave the new modem/router with whatever LAN subnet it provides.  You might have to "force" the computers to get a new IP address, etc. A reboot would do that and there are other ways if a reboot is inconvenient.

If any of the computers or printers or ..... ? have manually entered network settings (IP address, etc.) then you could either configure the modem/router LAN subnet to match what you have (as above) OR you could manually enter the network settings on those machines to match the new modem/router LAN subnet AND avoid the DHCP range as it may be different than the one you have now.

Steps to take:
1) Determine the new modem/router LAN subnet and DHCP range that comes "out of the box".
2) Compare this with your current network re: static/manually-entered IP addresses.
3) Decide on one of the approaches above making sure the new DHCP range does not include any of your static addresses.  

IF the LAN subnet for the new modem/router happens to be the same as the old one then perhaps all you have to do is change the DHCP range on it IF you have any static addresses that are in that range.  OR you can change those static addresses to be outside the default range.

I hope this helps.
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David AtkinIT ProfessionalCommented:
If your external IP is changing and you are utiliting Exchange then you may need to think about your external DNS records.  

For example, if you get a new static IP you may need to change the MX records on your domain to ensure that you continue to receive emails.
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eideeAuthor Commented:
currently is the only server on the network, running SBS03 with two network adapters (not modems, sorrry) that connects to a DSL modem at one side and to a hub on another side.  The DSL ISP gave me the static IP/gateway/DNS.  I am going to switch to cable, so I guess they will me a new set of numbers(?)
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eideeAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for comments.  I dont have Exchange.  The LAN has DHCP so can I just leave it as is? and just make the changes on the WAN only by using CEICW?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
If the static IP you were given was a public address then yes indeed you will get "a new set of numbers".  But the new number could be public or private depending on how they set up their modem and depending on what arrangements you've made with them.
Did you ask for a static  public IP address?
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
Ok that makes sense.

Does the server run DHCP?  If not I would setup DHCP on the server.

If you are getting DHCP from the DSL router then yes the computer will need to be taken care off. Just and ipconfig /release  then ipconfig /renew  will take care of them
What OS are the computers?

you have an Ethernet cable that comes from your dsl router to your server Ethernet adapter correct?  All you need to do there is plug new Ethernet cable from the cable modem into the same Ethernet adapter on the server.  Is that Ethernet adapter defined using DHCP or static?
If static then that will change with new information from the cable company. if DHCP then ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew  will work.
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