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Why can I ping other devices PC-NAME at Home but not anywhere else

Posted on 2013-11-26
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Last Modified: 2014-01-14
We have a very peculiar situation.  When at home we can ping all devices by thier PC or Device name connected to our router.  However, when at the office or another location, we can ping and connect to needed devices by the IP number.  The PC-Name does not work.

When we ping bi IP addrees, we get back the normal respond:

C:\>ping PC-Name

Pinging PC-Name [10.55.55.8] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.55.55.8: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 10.55.55.8: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 10.55.55.8: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 10.55.55.8: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 10.55.55.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

But when we ping at the office or another LAN, we get:

C:\>ping PC-Name
Ping request could not find host PC-Name. Please check the name and try again.

Let us know what we are doing wrong or what considerations we need to attend in order to ping by device name.
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Question by:rayluvs
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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:RKnebel512
ID: 39679269
It sounds like you are having a problem with DNS.  Do a "ipconfig /all" on your computer and see what your computers list for DNS servers.  Then see if the computer can ping the DNS by IP address.
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Expert Comment

by:David Lo
ID: 39679495
Do you have NetBIOS over TCP/IP enabled?  

The setting is in Local Area Connection Properties | Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP/IPv4) |General (Advanced...) | WINS | Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP.

Also NetBIOS only works within the same subnet.  If you want to see the pc name of a computer from another subnet, you will need to enable WINS.

There are many sites that have information on how to do this.  Here is one of them:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323388
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39681790
Yes, doing an "ipconfig /all" does display a DNS Server.  When ping it works (but pinging an IP always worked, its when pinging a PC-Name).

As for Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP, it is not enabled.  As a matter of fact, the PCs in the domain has this option enables; all is disabled.  One of the reason of enabling is because is dangerous viable exploit to the device.

Also at home, we have no domain, but small workgroup; no pc has this option enabled.
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Expert Comment

by:RKnebel512
ID: 39681830
Then from the command prompt try "nslookup PC-Name".  This will ask the DNS server for the IP address of the computer you are looking for.  

If it can't find it, then there is something wrong with the DNS server.  Check to make sure all the hosts are listed in DNS.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39682127
Ok, don e it; results:

C:\>nslookup PC-Name
Server:  Sname.Domain
Address:  100.50.1.1

*** Sname.Domain can't find PC-Name: Server failed

C:\>

Ok, then this mean that at the office, there something wrong with the DNS, but where in my PC or the Office Server/Domain.

Please note, that at the office, all other PC connected to the domain works just fine and can ping any PC-NAME within the domain.
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Expert Comment

by:RKnebel512
ID: 39682152
It is probably a problem on the server.  Your PC has the correct DNS address, so when it sends a DNS request for PC-Name, the server sends back a message saying that it cannot find that name in its records.

a couple questions, just to be clear:
Your DNS server's name is Sname and that's the correct address of 100.50.1.1 right?
And is your PC literally named "PC-Name"?
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39682655
no that is a fake name and IP (not allow to use real reference info).
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Expert Comment

by:RKnebel512
ID: 39682685
Fair enough.  Just thought the stuff above looked pasted in.  But yes, it looks like a problem on your DNS server.  I would check to make sure it has a listing for PC-Name.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39688989
You mean our office server has the DNS problem or the DNS in our PC?  And if it is the office serever, what do we have to do? (FYI: we have no problems with all other PC in the office only our notebook when we connect here)
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by:RKnebel512
ID: 39689107
Right.  When you say you are having no other problems, there might be two different meanings.  But this is how I am understanding it.  Correct me if I am misinterpreting:

- When connecting your notebook at the office, no other PCs can ping PC-name (notebook)
- All the other PCs are able to ping other PCs (PC-office1 can ping PC-office2)
- PC-name is able to ping other office PCs (PC-name can ping PC-office1)

If the above is the case, the problem is on the office server.  Go to the server, click on the start menu, and select Administrator Tools --> DNS.  It will pull up a window with the DNS tree on it.  This is a listing of all the machines that DNS will be able to give addresses for.  I believe that PC-office1 and PC-office2 will have listings there, but PC-name will not.  

In this window, find where PC-office1 and PC-office2 are listed.  Then click "More Actions" off to the right in the window, and select "New A Record".  Then type in the information for PC-name including the IP address.  Then the other PCs should be able to ping it.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39692838
Answers o your questions:

- When connecting your notebook at the office, no other PCs can ping PC-name (notebook)

No.   When connecting our notebook at the office, our notebook cannot ping other PC by their PC name.  We can only ping by their IP number.

- All the other PCs are able to ping other PCs (PC-office1 can ping PC-office2)

Yes.  At the office, all PC located there can ping to each other by their PC name and also by thier IP value.

- PC-name is able to ping other office PCs (PC-name can ping PC-office1)

Don't understand this question; seems to be the same as the previous.  However, if you mean "PC-name" by our notebook, then No, our notebook cannot ping to other PC by their PC-name when we are at the office.

Nevertheless, our notebook when at home, without any necessary configuration done to the router or notebook, can ping by the device PC-name when at home.

As for the instruction, seems excellent, will proceed when at the office.  But please advice on the answers given if by any change affect the instructions you have provided.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39733815
placed request attention.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Qlemo earned 125 total points
ID: 39734713
Your usage of names and fake data is confusing. Please use clear names, like PC-Home, PC-Office1, PC-DNS and such.
I don't take it you have a VPN from Home to Office, and you are using PC-Name both as a fake for devices at home and in the office.

To me it is obvious that you have the wrong domain suffix for DNS on PC-Home when in office. Issue the Ipconfig /all again, and review the DNS related entries - are the suffixes correct? DNS needs suffixes to allow for proper name resolution. If there is a DNS server configured and reachable, that DNS server has to know about how to resolve the name you asked for.

As example: You don't have any DNS suffixes configured in your NIC. When at home, the DNS server is not reachable. Windows tries to resolve names by broadcast then.
In your office, you still don't have suffixes. But since you do not have the NetBIOS stuff enabled, no broadcasts will be used, and the DNS server is the only one able to resolve names. But without the (proper) DNS suffix, it won't be able to do.
If I'm correct, pinging e.g.  pc-office1.domain.suffix should work.
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Expert Comment

by:Davis McCarn
ID: 39734738
At home you are using the Computer Browser service which looks for a Master Browser to get the list of computers from and that is working.

At work, we need more info to sort things out.
Are you logging onto the domain?  If you are not, then the server will not respond to your requests.

Is the server acting as your DHCP and/or DNS server?  If it is, the values in ipconfig should have the correct ip for the server in the DNS entry.

Be careful; though, as fixing the work network may easilly break the home network.

A possible workaround would be to add entries to the HOSTS file for the "PC-NAMES" you need in the office in the form of:
10.100.0.2 <tab> server.mydomain
10.100.0.10 <tab> janes-pc
10.100.0.15 <tab> jenny-pc
(etc.)

After editing, reboot to see the changes.
How to edit HOSTS: http://www.jafaloo.com/windows-hosts-file/
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Assisted Solution

by:Rich Rumble
Rich Rumble earned 125 total points
ID: 39734759
When you get an IP from a DHCP server, if it's assigning you one of it's DNS servers, it should work. You can use other tools to see where your firewall or some other setting might be blocking DNS resolution away from you're home.
Try this:
nslookup pc-name dns-server-name (or IP)
nslookup google.com 8.8.8.8
Server:  google-public-dns-a.google.com
Address:  8.8.8.8

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:    google.com
Addresses:  2607:f8b0:4009:807::1003
          173.194.46.101
          173.194.46.110
          173.194.46.98
          173.194.46.96
          173.194.46.102
          173.194.46.97
          173.194.46.100
          173.194.46.103
          173.194.46.105
          173.194.46.104
          173.194.46.99
Try public names like that as well as the internal office names and name servers. If both fail turn off the firewall, perhaps you AV even has a firewall that is block DNS. Perhaps you have a HOSTS file that is "wildcarded" to drop any names other than you're own networks.
-rich
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Assisted Solution

by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 250 total points
ID: 39734812
I would guess that either:

1] The Windows (or 3rd-party) firewall on the PC in question is blocking DNS queries or responses, or

2] The DNS suffix is incorrect on the PC in question, so the DNS server isn't looking in the right place to resolve the hostname.

3] The configured DNS server is incorrect.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39734917
OK to answer will check tomorrow at the office.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39739432
just finish checking and most likely the configured DNS server can be the culprit at the office.

At our LAN, we can successfully ping all devices using their device-name.  At the office, only IP value can be used for a successful ping.

In conclusion, the PC is not the cause.

This being said, how can we determine or identify the problem at the server level at the office?

More server info:
- windows server
- domain used (all PC at the office is connected vi domain except our PC which is not at the domain, yet we have a domain-user name assign in order to get to the server folders and resources)

please advice.
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Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 39739436
May I remind you to follow http:#a39734713 ?
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Expert Comment

by:Davis McCarn
ID: 39740053
At home you are using the Computer Browser service which looks for a Master Browser to get the list of computers from and that is working.

Because you are not logging into the domain, you're not getting access to AD which is where the list of office PC's is being kept and that explains the issue.

A workaround would be to add entries to the HOSTS file for the "PC-NAMES" you need in the office in the form of:
10.100.0.2 <tab> server.mydomain
10.100.0.10 <tab> janes-pc
10.100.0.15 <tab> jenny-pc

After editing, reboot to see the changes.
How to edit HOSTS: http://www.jafaloo.com/windows-hosts-file/
0
 

Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39740374
Hi Qlemo,

As per ID: 39739436:

"I don't take it you have a VPN from Home to Office, and you are using PC-Name both as a fake for devices at home and in the office."

Correct, don't have VPN Home >> Office.  All Home >> Office and Office >> Home is via Logmein,  Also correct, I am using "PC-Name" both as a fake for devices at home and in the office; will proceed to identify them accordingly when responding to the thread.  From this point on we'll refer to the decie that we use at home and at the office as Notebook.  Our notebook ping using PC name when at home but when at the office,

"To me it is obvious that you have the wrong domain suffix for DNS on PC-Home when in office?

Could be as yiou say, wrong domain suffix for DNS on my notebook, that is why our inquiry at ID: 39739432; how can we determine or identify the problem at the server level at the office?  (below our LAN adapter config)

ipc
Hi DavisMcCarn,

We are logging into a Domain.  Though the notebook is not configured as part as a Domain, we must use a domain-user-name in order to use the domain resources.

We will try your recommendations.
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Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 39775332
Your NIC config doesn't show anything besides getting all info from DHCP. You'll have to look at the results of ipconfig /all to see the current settings.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39775354
Hi Qlemo... On Monday will run ipconfig/all and send result, but the DNS server and alternate DNS are correct to the domain.  As for suffixes, please advice where we can check and what info should be there?
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Expert Comment

by:Davis McCarn
ID: 39775365
Ramante!  Because he is NOT logging into the domain. none of the AD resources are available (period!!!)
Without the AD DNS, he's stuck with a general search for the server/computer and my own, simple ECC "server" started casting the internet with no luck in 2006.
He can add the entries to the HOSTS file which will work or beat his head against the wall until the cows come home.
Capiche?
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39775772
My computer does have access to the domains resources.  Even though my computer is not part of the domain, I have a domain user assigned to me that when logged, I have access to folders, drives, printers, internet, etc.

Will check tomorrow for the ipconfig/all and try HOSTS file.

But can you explain about the suffix and where is it located?
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Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 39775972
Best to explain if you show a screenshot or copy&paste of the output.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39776301
I am going to post the ipconfig/all as requested.  What other output screenshot do you need?
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Beck
ID: 39776313
If your PC doesn't query the correct DNS zone because it's not being given the DNS suffix via DHCP you won't be able to ping anything unless you use the FQDN of the PCs in the office.

Qlemo is correct.

So, if your domain name is mydomain.local, you won't be able to ping a PC in the office called PC1 unless you use ping PC1.mydomain.local
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39776325
You may be correct.  Rereading the previous posts didn't notice that the pinging had to be "PC1.mydomain.local".  I have been always pinging PC1.

So by what your saying that if my PC is not part of a domain but connected to one by a user name, the only way pinging a device in a domain is including the ".mydomain.local" after the PC name?
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Assisted Solution

by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 250 total points
ID: 39776370
If you're using a DNS server which includes an Active-Directory integrated domain, yes.

The DNS server will just check to see if it knows about the host 'PC1', but it can't determine which DNS zone to return a result from.  If you think about this logically the DNS server could have multiple zones with the same hostnames.

So, you need to tell the DNS server which zone you want to return a result from.  You do that by sending the DNS-suffix in the query.  This is usually true even if your DHCP server gives the DNS-suffix to the non-domain client.

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Users\craigbeck>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : PC1
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : test.local
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : domain.local

Wireless LAN adapter WLAN:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : domain.local
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) Centrino(R) Ultimate-N 6300 AGN
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.49(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 13 January 2014 09:02:22
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 21 January 2014 09:02:23
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.254
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.5

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.5
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled


C:\Users\craigbeck>ping server
Ping request could not find host server. Please check the name and try again.

C:\Users\craigbeck>ping server.domain.local

Pinging server.domain.local [192.168.0.150] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.0.49: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.0.49: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.0.49: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.0.49: Destination host unreachable.

Ping statistics for 192.168.0.150:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Here, I have the domain suffix from the DNS server I have, but it's not the same domain as my PC.  Therefore when I try to ping the server just using its hostname, it fails.  I've edited this slightly to hide some info, but the relevant parts stay the same.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39776400
Thank you very much! All does sound very logical!

Going to test this when we get to the office.
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Author Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39780945
Thanx! You are correct!  The proper manner to ping or refer to all resource when not part of a domain but is assign a user to enter the domain is with the suffix!

Thanx all!
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Author Closing Comment

by:rayluvs
ID: 39780959
Thank you all for your patience!
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