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Merge two 1D arrays into one 2D array

Posted on 2013-11-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-01
Is it possible to merge two one dimensional arrays into one two dimensional array using VBA?

For example's sake:
arrSource1 = Jack, Rebbeca, John
arrSource2 = Fredrick, Larson, Higgins

arrDestination:
arrDestination(0, 0) = Jack, Fredrick
arrDestination(1, 1) = Rebbeca, Larson
arrDestination(2, 2) = John, Higgins
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Question by:MacroShadow
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8 Comments
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39682887
for i = 0 to arrsource1.length-1
    arrdestination(i, i) = arrsource1(i) & arrSource2(i)
next
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Author Comment

by:MacroShadow
ID: 39682924
Thanks Dan, you got me going in the right direction.

Sub Test()
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim arrSource1() As String, arrSource2() As String

    arrSource1 = Split("Jack,Rebbeca,John", ",")
    arrSource2 = Split("Fredrick,Larson,Higgins", ",")
    
    ReDim arrDestination(0 To UBound(arrSource1), 0 To UBound(arrSource2))
    
    For i = 0 To UBound(arrDestination)
        arrDestination(i, i) = arrSource1(i) & arrSource2(i)
        Debug.Print arrDestination(i, i)
    Next
End Sub

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LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39682932
I really don't understand what you're trying to achieve.

Reserving space for your 2-dimensional array seems a bit wasteful, since you're using it as a 1-dimensional array anyway (you only use the diagonal, if you have a graphic representation).

You can simply use arrDestination(i) = arrSource1(i) & arrSource2(i)
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LVL 27

Author Comment

by:MacroShadow
ID: 39683054
Sometimes I need an element from the first dimension, and sometimes an element from the second dimension, that's why I must keep the elements separate.
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LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39683070
You can try a dictionary:

Dim dict As Dictionary
     
Set dict = New Dictionary

For i = 0 To UBound(arrSource1)
        dict.Add = arrSource1(i), arrSource2(i)
Next
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LVL 76

Accepted Solution

by:
GrahamSkan earned 500 total points
ID: 39683182
The logical way to use a two dimensional array in this instance would be to use one index to differentiate between the fore and the family names, and the other the differentiate between individuals
Sub Test()
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim arrSource1() As String, arrSource2() As String

    arrSource1 = Split("Jack,Rebbeca,John", ",")
    arrSource2 = Split("Fredrick,Larson,Higgins", ",")

    'assuming that each source has the same number of names
    ReDim arrDestination(0 To 1, 0 To UBound(arrSource1))
    
    For i = 0 To UBound(arrDestination, 2)
        arrDestination(0, i) = arrSource1(i)
        arrDestination(1, i) = arrSource2(i)
        Debug.Print arrDestination(0, i), arrDestination(1, i)
    Next
End Sub

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Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39683193
@GrahamSkan: my brain is taking a break today.
I kept looking at the example and asking myself: why does he create a NXN table when he needs a dictionary?
It was obvious he needed to just create a 2XN table and be done :)
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LVL 76

Expert Comment

by:GrahamSkan
ID: 39683298
It's easy to get hold of the wrong end of the stick when it's presented that way.
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