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chkdsk - not enough space to replace bad clusters

Hi

Does anyone know how I can run chkdsk without getting the message that "there is not enough space to replace bad clusters"? There is plenty of spare disk space on the drive.

I realise I have to replace the drive as it is throwing up too many errors but I am trying to get an image of the drive (I usually use Macrium Reflect for this) so that I don't have to reinstall all of the programs.

I tried disk cleanup which appeared to work in part but I am still getting these messages.

Thanks
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grapey100
Asked:
grapey100
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3 Solutions
 
IanThCommented:
I would say look at hdd regenerator
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grapey100Author Commented:
Forgot the screen shot!
Not-enough-space.JPG
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grapey100Author Commented:
Is HDD Regenerator anything like Spinrite? I have run Spinrite on the disk and it didn't find any surface errors.
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grapey100Author Commented:
IanTh

I've pretty much done everything I can suggested in the link you posted. I have the drive attached to another PC via a USB adapter in order to run chkdsk /r

I am interested in your first suggestion of HDD Regenerator but don't want to invest in yet another tool unless it is highly rated.

Have you used it successfully?

Thanks
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IanThCommented:
yes to fix laptops but on their website it does work on raid successfully
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grapey100Author Commented:
Okay t hanks - I'll have a punt at that
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Sasha KranjacCommented:
Hi,

I don't know if you are able to boot from the disk you are refering to, but you can try:

1. boot using Windows DVD, choose repair and check the disk (use /F /R options within CHKDSK)
2. place the disk in another PC, use SMART disk utility software to check if the disk electronics are okay, check the disk within Windows. Try these:
 - TestDisk http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk
 - HDDScan http://hddscan.com/,
 - Gsmartcontrol http://gsmartcontrol.berlios.de/home/index.php/en/Downloads
 - SeaTools http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/seatools

It seems like drive has some electronics problems but can't tell much without testing.

Good luck!
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grapey100Author Commented:
SasaK - I can still boot from the drive (into Windows 8). I 'll take a look at your suggestions.

Thanks
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Sasha KranjacCommented:
I would still boot from another drive so that OS or application can dismount the drive if needed.
Please be careful - any repairs and interventions can make data unavailable/unusable. Try to make a backup first if possible.
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weifaiCommented:
If you get random errors on the HDD, while getting no error with HDD diagnostic utilities, then you should check the power source: starting with the connectors at the HDD (do they fit firmly?) and finishing with inspecting capacitors in the power source itself; they may be bloated or dried out.
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grapey100Author Commented:
Weifai - thanks for your comment. Since I had problems with this disk when it was in place in the PC and when it was connected to another PC via a USB adapter I can't see that it is a power source issue?? The reason I noticed the problem initially was the other day, when I installed Macrium Reflect backup and tried to take an image backup of the disk so there were read errors then. I must admit that, running chkdsk on it via the USB adapter seems to generate more and more sector issues each time I try however the adapter I am using has been used on many other drives without a problem.
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weifaiCommented:
Aha. So, the HDD is plugged via an USB enclosure? Hmm, then try to plug it through an USB hub with an additional power source, not to the computer's USB directly. I admit that the HDD itself might be failing, but it may give you the chance to back up at least.
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grapey100Author Commented:
Weifai,

The USB adapter has its own mains power source. I managed to get a Windows 7 image backup when it was in place in the PC but it said there was some data it was not able to save so I don't know if the restore to a new drive will give me a working PC. I have just received some new hard drives and I plan to try this out tomorrow.

Thanks
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Sasha KranjacCommented:
Wherever the drive is mounted currently (USB, FireWire enclosure, eSata i.e externally) mount the drive using SATA (or ATA) cable and then try to check for errors.

Some low-cost adapters or faulty adapters could translate drive commands incorrectly.

If the drive is connected to a possibly faulty power source, disconnect it and use reliable power source because it could damage the drive's electronic components.
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nobusCommented:
i suggest to connect the drive direcly to a sata cable - NOT over USB
Why ?  the Usb interfacve does not handle errorscorrect- as you've found
post results !
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grapey100Author Commented:
Thanks for all the comments. I managed to get the image via Windows backup before the disk got too messed up and have successfully restored it to a new drive. I think HDD Regenerator may be useful in the future but probably only for a drive where I am not first trying to image it but am trying to get Windows to recognise the drive before trying to recover lost data.

I think the most useful comment is to use a direct Sata connection in the future rather than a USB one. I was not aware that the USB interface could introduce its own problems!

Many thanks
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nobusCommented:
agreed, and tx for feedback - not many people know that; they think it's all the same...
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