Service-policy and policy-map types

Hi,

can some one point me to list of all the different policy types and what affect it has to use them?

when I create a policy map I can on the 6500 chose a type of

Control
Test
Lan-queing

But I cant seem to find much documentation about what it means if you specify this. and what is the differences if under an interface i apply a policy map as

service-policy type TEST/Lan-queing <name>

Cheers
LVL 16
Aaron StreetInfrastructure ManagerAsked:
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Aaron StreetConnect With a Mentor Infrastructure ManagerAuthor Commented:
OH now I get it!

if you create a

#policy-map type test

you don't get the options to set any options apart from matching class.

type lan-que is the same it restricts your options to those you can apply in a layer two service policy.

So all its doing it filtering the commands you can apply so it will work when you go to apply it to a specific type of interface or situation.
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koudryCommented:
The Cisco 6500 platform, is a switch. You can still implement QoS for both data and VoIP but it is a little tricky.

You may be able to do marking, classification and policing on a switch port that you can turn into layer 3 port with the "no switchport" command.  For this, you will need to create access lists for each queue/class-map that you are intending to use and you attach the queues to your untrusted QoS policy that goes on your Layer 3 port.

I think you can do queueing using the "mls qos srr-queue" command. You may also need "mls qos map" command.

The documents below, may provide some ideas.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps5023/products_tech_note09186a0080883f9e.shtml

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/solutions/Enterprise/WAN_and_MAN/QoS_SRND/QoSDesign.html
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Aaron StreetInfrastructure ManagerAuthor Commented:
Hi I get QOS, and layer 2 QOS is more straight forward than routers I think.  

but just not sure about the types of policy-maps.

I under stand you would use

#policy-map type control <name> for when you are applying to the control  plane
#policy-map type lan-que <name> for layer 2 interface maps

not sure about

#policy-map type test <name> but assume its for some kind of testing.

But how do they differ. is this just a name or dose setting the type have a impact on how they can be applied or operate?
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koudryCommented:
This document provides further explanation and sample config.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/isg/command/reference/isg_m1.html#wp1331104
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Aaron StreetInfrastructure ManagerAuthor Commented:
My question was specific to what the "type" keyword in the command did, not the command as a whole.

The "TYPE" keyword is a filter to insure you use the correct commands depending where you are intending to implement the policy. Making it a bit more intuitive and simple to remember.
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