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Making ice from carbonated water

I'm going to prepare and sell snow cones next summer. For making snow cones, I know that ice should come from carbonated water.

As in my country is quite difficult to find a proper ice factory that could produce ice with clean water, I'm planning to make my own ice for snow cones.

I was thinking to buy bottles of carbonated water, pour them in many plastic bags and freeze those bags. In that way I could get carbonated ice.

My question is:
Do you think that pouring carbonated water in plastic bags for producing ice would be a good idea? Or could I get adverse effects like water loosing sodium ?
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miyahira
Asked:
miyahira
5 Solutions
 
d-glitchCommented:
>> I know that ice should come from carbonated water.
I don't think that is true.  You should make I've from plain/flat water and chip it mechanically.  Much easier.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Yes, that is not true.  There are some commercial products (at least in the US) that are made from carbonated water/soda but not snow cones.  See here and the links at the bottom of the article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_cone
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miyahiraAuthor Commented:
No, ice for snow cones should came from carbonated water. I was told that from a snow cone maker. That's why snow cones last longer when you eat them.
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miyahiraAuthor Commented:
However, what you think about my planed method for making ice?
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d-glitchCommented:
I think you should prototype your operation with plain and carbonated water and see if it makes a big difference in the taste or melting characteristics.  Using bottled carbonated water is probably going to be much more expensive.
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aburrCommented:
" Or could I get adverse effects like water loosing sodium ? "
There will be no adverse effect. The pure water will not loose sodium. (It has no sodium to loose)

You do not need carbonated water. Just chop the regular ice finely.
If you do not believe those who say no carbonation needed, do the experiment. Make yourself two snow cones and compare them.
Personally I would not like the carbonated one.
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dhsindyRetiredCommented:
The CO2 in soda requires an excess under pressure.  I don't think the plastic bags could stand enough pressure.  Besides, most of the water freezes out first leaving the inpurities behind.  There would be very little CO2 trapped at the end.  Probably not enought to make it fizz.
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MereteCommented:
You might consider what they call DRY ICE
It is poured over the flavoured juice freezing it instantly in a crunch fine form of ice full of flavour.
Dry Ice is frozen carbon dioxide, you need to read up and learn about the safe handling proceedures
http://www.dryiceinfo.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_ice
MAKE YOUR OWN DRY ICE
http://coldchain.polar-tech.com/viewitems/ries-az2-snow-cone-dry-ice-snow-maker-direct-mount/ount-az2-snow-cone-dry-ice-snow-maker-direct-mount
You could simply make fine crushed ice scoop that in to a cup and pour over ice
carbonated flavoured soft drink.
Like from a soda stream with flavoured carbonated juice Ginger, raspberry/ lime and so on.
http://www.1-800-shaved-ice.com/shiceandsnco.html
http://www.arcticiceworks.com.au/snow-cone-machine/
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