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Help with understanding Certificates in Active Directory Certificate Services

Posted on 2013-12-01
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
http://blogs.technet.com/b/meamcs/archive/2010/12/01/auto-enrollment-avoid-the-challenges-of-making-end-users-manage-their-certificates.aspx

The articles aboves says

"When a GPO with auto-enrollment configured is applied to a client, the client downloads all published certificate templates in the forest and stores them in the local registry in the following key HKEY_CURRENT_USER/Software/Microsoft/Cryptography/Certificate TemplateCache, each Template having its own registry key
The client checks the template for Read and Autoenroll permission, if these permissions are granted the client, it generates a key pair locally
If input is required from the user a balloon appears in the system tray asking the user for input
The Client creates a Certificate request and sends this request along with its public key to the Issuing CA. The request is based on the certificate template on which the user is granted Read and Autoenroll
the Issuing CA creates a certificate that has the Clients public key, stores it and issues it to the client
If the Publish Certificate in Active Directoryoptions is chosen, the certificate is also published in Active Directory and made available for other clients in the domain
The user now has a certificate associated with its private key and can now use it."

I need the following clarification:
"the Issuing CA creates a certificate that has the Clients public key, stores it and issues it to the client"

My understanding is:
The Issuing CA creates a new Private/Public Key pair, stores it, and then issues the entire new Private/Public Key pair to the Client (using the Client's other Public Key pair received earlier to encrypt and prevent repudiation).

The Client now has a new Private/Public key pair.
All AD Domain Members automatically Trust the Root CA, and therefore that new Private/Public key pair becomes useable/valid on the Domain.
The Client can now give out the Public Key to whatever host or service application wants it to encrypt information, as well as to identify the Client.

Multiple copies of both the Private Key and its associated Public are stored on various computers.

A copy of the Private is stored on the Issuing CA server, the Client, as well as AD if the "Publish to AD" option is chosen.

Is this correct?
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Question by:JCTDD
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Will Szymkowski earned 1500 total points
ID: 39689684
The above is correct. I would also ensure that "Enroll" is enabled as well. There are some MS documentation which state Read and AutoEnroll are only needed but I have come across others as well which state Read, AutoEnroll and Enroll, which works for me.

I would also recommend that you create a "Key archival and recovery Agent" which is needed to recover and restore damaged or missing Private Keys.

Key archival and recovery - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc781351(WS.10).aspx

Will.
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