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How to group by and sum in linq

Posted on 2013-12-02
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Last Modified: 2016-02-10
I have a list <T>

within which i have four fields

Code   - string
ProductGroup string
Price - decimal
BusinessDate - datetime


I need to Group by  ProductGroup, and BusinessDate ( just the month and year part)
Meaning all dates in a month are grouped, and I need to sum the Price to give me a new list

T1

with

ProductGroup
BusDate ( this would hold just 01/MM/YYYY)
Price (sum of all prices in that month
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Question by:countrymeister
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2 Comments
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:Angelp1ay
ID: 39691268
        private class InputType
        {
            public String Code;
            public String ProductGroup;
            public Decimal Price;
            public DateTime BusinessDate;
        }

        private class ResultType
        {
            public String ProductGroup;
            public Decimal Sum;
            public DateTime Month;
        }

        public void MyFunction()
        {

            List<InputType> input = new List<InputType>();

            IEnumerable<ResultType> output = from c in input
                                             group c by new
                                             {
                                                 c.ProductGroup,
                                                 c.BusinessDate.Year,
                                                 c.BusinessDate.Month,
                                             } into grp
                                             select new ResultType()
                                             {
                                                 ProductGroup = grp.Key.ProductGroup,
                                                 Month = new DateTime(grp.Key.Year, grp.Key.Month, 1),
                                                 Sum = grp.Sum(s => s.Price),
                                             };
        }

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LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
Angelp1ay earned 500 total points
ID: 39691738
I figured I should put some example data in and explain better. I've added some data for Product Groups "G1" and "G2" spread over January and February and I've also added a second output which does exactly the same in Linq Method Syntax.

        public void MyFunction()
        {
            List<InputType> input = new List<InputType>();
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C123", ProductGroup = "G1", Price = 1.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 1, 1) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C124", ProductGroup = "G1", Price = 2.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 1, 15) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C125", ProductGroup = "G1", Price = 3.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 2, 4) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C126", ProductGroup = "G1", Price = 4.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 2, 26) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C123", ProductGroup = "G2", Price = 1.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 1, 1) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C124", ProductGroup = "G2", Price = 1.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 1, 15) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C125", ProductGroup = "G2", Price = 1.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 1, 4) });
            input.Add(new InputType() { Code = "C126", ProductGroup = "G2", Price = 1.00m, BusinessDate = new DateTime(1, 2, 26) });

            IEnumerable<ResultType> output = from c in input
                                             group c by new
                                             {
                                                 c.ProductGroup,
                                                 c.BusinessDate.Year,
                                                 c.BusinessDate.Month,
                                             } into grp
                                             select new ResultType()
                                             {
                                                 ProductGroup = grp.Key.ProductGroup,
                                                 Month = new DateTime(grp.Key.Year, grp.Key.Month, 1),
                                                 Sum = grp.Sum(s => s.Price),
                                             };

            IEnumerable<ResultType> output2 = input
                .GroupBy(x => new {x.ProductGroup,
                                   x.BusinessDate.Year,
                                   x.BusinessDate.Month})
                .Select(grp => new ResultType() {ProductGroup = grp.Key.ProductGroup, 
                                                 Month = new DateTime(grp.Key.Year, grp.Key.Month,1), 
                                                 Sum = grp.Sum(i => i.Price)});
        }

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Both outputs do the same thing - the first is Linq Query Syntax, the second is Linq Method Syntax (but they both do exactly the same thing under the hood). You can use whichever you're more comfortable with or you find easier to read/maintain.

First I group using an anonymous type that contains all the attributes you want to group on (the product group, year and month).

Then I project the results into the desired target type, extracting the Product Group, Year and Month from the group, wrapping the Year and Month in a new DateTime, and finally by summing the price across the group.

As you can see in this debug screenshot, it works as expected (showing the second group which is Product Group G1 in Feb).
Stepping through showing Linq in action
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