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Joining tables in different mySQL databases on same server, different instances

We have an application that uses two instances of mysql, running on two different ports on the same server, say 4510 and 4511.  Table "A" has transaction details and a user number, Table "B" (on 4511) has user details.  I need to simply join the two tables to provide all of the transaction details and the associated user name.  Apparently if these two databases were on the same mysql port, this would be pretty simple.  However, I'm not sure how to make it work in this case.

The only thing I've found so far relates to using a federated storage engine and federated table.  Is this the correct (only?) way to do what I need to do?
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Chuck Brown
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Chuck Brown
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Chuck BrownAuthor Commented:
Sorry, joining two tables isn't the real problem.  Joining two tables in two different databases residing in two different databases that run under two different ports on the same server is the issue.  Thanks for trying!
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gr8gonzoConsultantCommented:
Federated storage engine is the only way to do it with native MySQL functionality, but it's not the only way. Honestly, I would likely use some kind of intermediate scripting / programming language to pull the data separately and join it together.

For example, if you were using a .NET language, it would be trivial to create the two separate connections, then pull all the data into separate DataTable objects (optionally use a DataSet object to join them together) and go from there. The same thing could be done in a scripting language, like PHP.
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gr8gonzoConsultantCommented:
The only downside to the scripted approach is that the final, joined data exists within the scope of the application that did the joining, so that might be good or bad depending on your goals.
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Chuck BrownAuthor Commented:
Is there a downside to using the Federated Storage Engine?
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Chuck BrownAuthor Commented:
virastar,

Thanks.  That may be closer, I'm not sure.  The end result of that solution is (apparently) to grant access between the databases, but doesn't say how that is to be done, nor how to actually do a query between the two once permission is granted.
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gr8gonzoConsultantCommented:
@virastar - that article uses the intermediate programming/scripting language approach that I mentioned, but pushing the data back into temp tables is likely slower than just using the in-memory data.

@clbrownjr - Aside from initial setup, no, there's no real downside. On the backend, it's technically doing the same thing - it's just using the MySQL client as the intermediate piece instead of a separate application. If you're good with enabling the federated storage, then it should be a fine solution.

Just to set expectations, remember that no matter what you do, you're dealing with two different, separately-optimized tables, so the solution will always be slower than using a single instance containing both tables.
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