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Help deciphering symbols on a network diagram connecting switches

Posted on 2013-12-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
1.  What do the abbreviations and numbers mean in the below diagrams?
2.  What does PO11 mean?
3.  What do the two rings mean?
4.  What does L2 Etherchannel mean.  I know it's faster than regular ethernet but how much?
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Question by:brothertruffle880
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by:Ernie Beek
Ernie Beek earned 166 total points
ID: 39699588
1.  What do the abbreviations and numbers mean in the below diagrams?
The name of the interfaces on the switches. Gi 3/3 = Gigabitethernet 3/3 (slot/port)

2.  What does PO11 mean?
Another sort of interface: PortChannel 11. This is used to create the Etherchannel by adding interfaces to the portchannel.

3.  What do the two rings mean?
That this is an etherchannel. Two or more interfaces bundled and acting as one interface with the combined speed of the physical interfaces.

4.  What does L2 Etherchannel mean
See 3
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by:Paul MacDonald
Paul MacDonald earned 167 total points
ID: 39699589
It's difficult to tell without the broader context of the rest of the images, but in both cases I would guess those are connections between switch stacks.  

Etherchannel is a port aggregation protocol, so in both cases, I'm guessing the encircled links appear as a single, higher-throughput connection.
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jss1199 earned 167 total points
ID: 39699597
1. Gix/x refers to the switch number in the stack and port #. Gi refers to Gigabit speed versus eth (10/100).
2. PO11 refers to the ether-channel port number (likely layer 1)
3. Ether-channel - either layer 1 or 2 - the layer2 is specifically called L2 ether-channel
4. See http://ciscoiseasy.blogspot.com/2010/11/lesson-24-layer-2-etherchannel.html
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