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How to gzip JSON from PHP using AJAX?

Hi,

I'm wondering how I can gzip json data from PHP with an AJAX call.

I was reading here that in PHP 5.4 you can use:

json_encode($data,JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE);

Unfortunately, I don't have PHP 5.4 installed right now.

So the other user suggested:

ob_start('ob_gzhandler');

But that just doesn't work when I place that code at the top of my PHP file. Server returns error.

I'm looking for an alternative to:
json_encode($data,JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE);

and also how would I unzip the json data in the $.ajax call:

$.ajax({
    type : 'post',
    url: './model/06_modCheckPrimaryBeneficiaries' + sAppendDateTime + '.php',
    cache: false,
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(retData, textStatus, jqXHR) {
        var test = retData;
    },
    error: function(XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
        console.log('textStatus: '+textStatus);
    });

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Victor Kimura
Asked:
Victor Kimura
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4 Solutions
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
If you are talking about delivering your JSON in 'gzip' format to the browser, that is not something that you choose or do.  That is a negotiation between the browser and the web server.

In the HTTP request from the browser, the browser tells the server what formats it can accept in the response.  In the HTTP response (when 'gzip' is acceptable), the server checks the file size to determine whether it would be quicker to just send a small file or gzip and send a larger file and then does what seems to be the best choice.
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Victor KimuraAuthor Commented:
Oh, okay.

So, this code:
json_encode($data,JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE);

isn't really gzipping it then?

Is that true of some .js files too? I have another post here that you may be able to answer too:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Server_Software/Web_Servers/Apache/Q_28313939.html
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
The 'gzip' method of sending data from the server to the browser is the same for all file types.  You can 'gzip' a file for storage on your server but that is a different thing.
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Victor KimuraAuthor Commented:
Ok, thanks.

just wondering if you know if this code:
json_encode($data,JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE);

will make the json data smaller or more efficient then just regular encoding.
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Ray PaseurCommented:
If the JSON is so large that making it smaller is a worthwhile objective, the application is misdesigned.  JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE is not related to GZIP.  PHP says: "Encode multibyte Unicode characters literally (default is to escape as \uXXXX). Available since PHP 5.4.0."

The JSON standard requires UTF-8.  PHP has a long history of thinking that a byte == a character, and this is not true in UTF-8, where characters can be made up from multiple bytes.  So my guess is that PHP was encoding the Unicode characters to try to play nice with legacy applications and avoid breaking the JSON standard.

See these links for more info on Unicode:
http://php.net/manual/en/json.constants.php
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Web_Development/Web_Languages-Standards/PHP/A_11880-Unicode-PHP-and-Character-Collisions.html
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Victor KimuraAuthor Commented:
Ok, I see. How big is too big? I have a some form fields that return in JSON format. The user can add several beneficiaries (it's for estate planning) to this particular page and each beneficiary the user adds increases the JSON by about 24 KB. So, if the user adds in 3 beneficiaries, then that JSON return is about 72 KB. Is that too large? I just want to see how I can optimize the JSON and what's considered too large. I'm trying to see how I can make this more efficient.

Thank you for your input.
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Ray PaseurCommented:
72KB is not too large, nor is ten times that.  I was thinking more like the size of the Amazon.com catalog as being too large.

If you're finding timeouts when you submit the form, you might consider a design that used AJAX to submit the form in parts.
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Victor KimuraAuthor Commented:
Thanks so much for your valuable input. Both of you! =)
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Ray PaseurCommented:
Glad we could help.  Thanks for the points and thanks for using EE, ~Ray
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
You're welcome, glad to help.
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