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Dealing with multiple Linksys WebView switches

Posted on 2013-12-09
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A while ago the old IT guy at our company got a new job and left, in his wake his assistant took over. The assistant was fired after abusing our systems and then remotely wiped and reset everything we have.

I'm trying to figure out the mess that's here now and the biggest issue I'm facing is that there are about 6 Linksys 48 port switches on our racks, all of them with WebView, and I can't figure out how to access each of them to find out how each thing is being routed.

When accessing the default 192.168.1.254 port, it leads me to an 8-port switch that I can not locate. If anybody could point me in a direction of how to deal with all these switches it would be greatly appreciated as Cisco has already passed an end-of-life on each of the switches.
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Question by:bahanley
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Fred Marshall earned 800 total points
ID: 39707501
If the switches were reset then there should be no worries resetting them again, eh?

The big worry would be special configurations for actual *switching* such as VLANs and the like.  But, if these really are old Linksys switches then perhaps there isn't even a VLAN capability to worry about.

After all, a managed switch is no different than an unmanaged switch except for the access.  That is, until, special features are turned on or configured.  In many cases it's a good bet that there are no special *switching* features configured at all.  Yes, it's a risk but it sounds like you've already faced into that risk.

To gain access you need to know the IP address assigned to the management interface.
Most likely, it's on your LAN subnet.  So, one thing you could try is to access each and every IP address with a web browser to see what pops up.  Tedious yes but the least obtrusive.

Otherwise, I would probably do this:
1) Get an "extra" switch to replace each of the others one at a time.
Normally I swap in a switch as follows:
Add an Ethernet cable on a spare port between the old and the new.
Then move all the cables port-for-port from the old to the new.
Then you can remove the added cable.
Other than ARP worries, this allows connectivity except for one cable at a time and briefly at that.  Of course, it relies on a bit of physical proximity to do it quickly.
2) When the existing switch is out of production, I would reset it to factory defaults IF I couldn't access it otherwise.  Then access it from a laptop at the default address.  As you've found, there is only one switch at the default 192.168.1.254 address.  That's why you need to take the switch out of the network if you're going to change it's address to the default.
3) When the switch is accessible, assign it a new IP address that's not conflicting and then you can put it back in the network by reversing the process above.

Admittedly, this is for a fairly simple situation.  But, I think you're already there anyway...

4) After the switch is back in production, you can access it to set up SNMP, label ports, etc.
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