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Identifying the ports in the back of my network device

Posted on 2013-12-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I think I'm looking at a disk array but I'm not sure.

I would appreciate a deciphering (or a link) describing the following abbreviations:
I have two RJ45 ports:  CGE0 and CGE1  What does CGE mean?
I have four Fiber ports BE0, BE0, FGE0, FGE1.  What's the diffeence between FGE and BE?

Finally two symbols which I am unable to accurately describe. (see graphic)
If you have links which describe these that would be great.

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Question by:brothertruffle880
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by:akalbfell
akalbfell earned 167 total points
ID: 39711037
You're correct. That is a SAN from EMC
I really don't know what CGE stands for although if I had to guess it would be Copper Gigabit Ethernet. Those are the ethernet ports on the data mover.
As you stated the other ports are fiber and the difference is just that one is copper and one is fiber. Just depends on which NIC was installed.

The first icon means if you chain your SAN to something do it from the bottom. The 2nd means no playing hockey near the SAN... (kidding of course, no idea what those icons are but I will take a look at my SAN this morning and see if and where they are.)
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by:Steve
Steve earned 166 total points
ID: 39711038
sounds like an EMC box you have there.

CGE ports are usually Ethernet ports for network connectivity.

FGE ports are optical network ports which connect to a suitable optical port in high end switches.

BE ports are usually fibre channel ports for storage systems.

Don't know what the icons in the graphics are for I'm afraid. Best check the user guide or contact EMC.
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Author Comment

by:brothertruffle880
ID: 39711312
Thanks to all.  But the EMC user guide I have in PDF form is no use!  I searched the online copy I had and found no "key to symbols"  And the one hard copy we had?  Those were "borrowed" long ago and never returned.

Hard to learn this stuff when the documentation isn't there.
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by:akalbfell
ID: 39711348
Couldn't find those symbols anywhere on my SANs... VNX 5300s

What model SAN is that?
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by:TimotiSt
ID: 39711911
The right icon looks like a classic "do not connect to phone system" (phone systems carry DC voltage, potentially bad for networking gear).
The left one looks like a Fibre channel loop icon. These days FC loops are usually used to hook up expansion disk boxes to storage head ends.

As @akalbfell says, if you can share an exact model no, we can try to look it up.

Tamas
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Author Comment

by:brothertruffle880
ID: 39712205
It's a Calera NS 480.
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TimotiSt earned 167 total points
ID: 39712299
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