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Slow file transfer on home network

Posted on 2013-12-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-19
So I have a .jpg file of about 2 Mb open on Computer A.  I save it to Computer B and it takes like 60 seconds.

How would I start to troubleshoot where the problem is?
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Question by:hrolsons
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8 Comments
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:Steven Harris
ID: 39719186
So I have a .jpg file of about 2 Mb open on Computer A.  I save it to Computer B and it takes like 60 seconds.

Can you provide some more information?

-Wired or wireless connection?
     -Network configuration
     -As a part of Homegroup
-Transfer cable?
    -Type
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Author Comment

by:hrolsons
ID: 39719206
The computer doing the saving has an Ethernet(powerline adapter) connection to the router that is connected to the Access Point through a regular Ethernet cord.  And it also has a wireless connection to the Access Point.  The computer being saved to has an Ethernet connection to the Access Point.  Both are part of the same homegroup.
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LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
Steven Harris earned 250 total points
ID: 39719229
You can try pinging the PC's from each other from the command line to establish connection speed between PCs.  Such as:

Ping statistics for 10.0.2.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 1ms

There is also a tool you can use called LAN SpeedTest.
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LVL 44

Assisted Solution

by:Darr247
Darr247 earned 250 total points
ID: 39719265
Step 1 would be limiting "the computer doing the saving" to either wired or wireless at one time during testing so you know which path is getting the speeds you're reading.

Next, what are you calling an "access point" ?  Do you mean you've converted a consumer-grade 4-LAN/1-WAN wireless router to an access point?  Because typically, dedicated access points have only one ethernet port... which connects to the LAN, not to an individual computer.

So then you'd want to try a transfer with both computers connected to the same switch by ethernet patch cords, and transferring different size files in both directions.
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Author Comment

by:hrolsons
ID: 39719267
@Darr247

It is a D-Link Xtreme N Duo Wireless Bridge/Access Point.

Off to do some pinging
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LVL 44

Assisted Solution

by:Darr247
Darr247 earned 250 total points
ID: 39719272
Then you could connect both computers to the 4-port switch in that and see what kind of transfer speeds you get. (check both directions.)
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Author Comment

by:hrolsons
ID: 39719309
Interesting...
Disabled Ethernet so just using wireless, pings were 796ms,715,ms,333ms
Disabled Wireless so just using Ethernet, pings were 2ms,5,ms,3ms

I guess my computer doesn't want to take the path of least resistance when offered a choice.
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LVL 18

Assisted Solution

by:Steven Harris
Steven Harris earned 250 total points
ID: 39719324
Since you are running multiple connections, try moving your Local Area Connection to first priority so your PC will automatically use that connection whenever it is available.

Network Connections (Adapters) > Advanced > Advanced Settings

Move Local Area Connection to top position.
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