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Posted on 2013-12-17
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How should i export bold parts from the given text below

IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.252 = STRING: 0:25:90:a8:9a:ef

and there is one additional thing if it has one char between two double dot  as this

IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.158.25 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49

it will export 00:04:ac:e3:e8:49 i mean it will add a 0 to infront of alone char between dots


IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.252 = STRING: 0:25:90:a8:9a:ef
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.253 = STRING: 0:25:90:a8:9a:ef
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.254 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:f1:5f
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.192.168.1.104 = STRING: 2:d0:68:12:4b:cc

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Question by:3XLcom
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Expert Comment

by:farzanj
ID: 39724487
So from this text,
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.252 = STRING: 0:25:90:a8:9a:ef

You want to extract IP address and MAC, this is all what I see is bolded?


Something like?

echo 'IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.185.9.159.252 = STRING: 0:25:90:a8:9a:ef' | sed 's/.*ipv4\.\([0-9\.]*\).*=.*STRING: \(.*\)/\1 \2/'

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Author Comment

by:3XLcom
ID: 39724522
i need to export this from a text file
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Expert Comment

by:farzanj
ID: 39724539
Export??  Adding 0 in front?  Also for IP?  Export where?
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Author Comment

by:3XLcom
ID: 39724592
my server generates tooo long text files as this and i want to export a result as :


172.16.1.21  ->  0:18:6e:37:cf:28
172.16.1.22  ->  00:01:e8:d6:53:37

but one important point on the text 00:01:e8:d6:53:37 that seems as 0:1:e8:d6:53:37 if it has one decimal between two dots it will add one more zero to infront of it



IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107755015.ipv4.172.16.1.21 = STRING: 0:18:6e:37:cf:28
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107755015.ipv4.172.16.1.22 = STRING: 0:1:e8:d6:53:37
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.10.1.1.1 = STRING: 0:1:e8:d6:53:37
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.3 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:70:d8
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.5 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.6 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.9 = STRING: 2:d0:68:12:4b:cc
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.18 = STRING: 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.19 = STRING: 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.20 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.21 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.34 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.35 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.36 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.39 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.67 = STRING: b8:ac:6f:97:82:6f
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.116 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.162 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:36:c1
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.178 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:50:fa
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.179 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.180 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.181 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.182 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.183 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.184 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.185 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:25:99
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.188 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.189 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.226 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.227 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.228 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.229 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.230 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.231 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.232 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.233 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.234 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.235 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.236 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49

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Expert Comment

by:farzanj
ID: 39724864
Ok, export word is still confusing.

Try this command:

perl -ne 'if(($a,$b)=m{ipv4\.(\S+)\s=\sSTRING:\s(\S+)}) { $b =~ s/\b(\d)\b/0$1/g; print "$a --> $b\n";} logfilename'

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change logfilename to the filename of your log file.

See what you get.  If you are happy with the output, you can redirect it to any file.
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Author Comment

by:3XLcom
ID: 39724879
This is the result :

[root@sflow islemler]# perl -ne 'if(($a,$b)=m{ipv4\.(\S+)\s=\sSTRING:\s(\S+)}) { $b =~ s/\b(\d)\b/0$1/g; print "$a --> $b\n";} snmplogs/router.txt'

Illegal division by zero at -e line 1, <> line 1.

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And txt file :

IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107755015.ipv4.172.16.1.21 = STRING: 0:18:6e:37:cf:28
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107755015.ipv4.172.16.1.22 = STRING: 0:1:e8:d6:53:37
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.10.1.1.1 = STRING: 0:1:e8:d6:53:37
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.3 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:70:d8
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.5 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.6 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.9 = STRING: 2:d0:68:12:4b:cc
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.18 = STRING: 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.19 = STRING: 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.20 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.21 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.34 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.35 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.36 = STRING: 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.39 = STRING: e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.67 = STRING: b8:ac:6f:97:82:6f
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.116 = STRING: 0:4:ac:e3:e8:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.162 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:36:c1
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.178 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:50:fa
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.179 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.180 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.181 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.182 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.183 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.184 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.185 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:25:99
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.188 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:c3
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.189 = STRING: 0:50:56:96:3:8b
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.226 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.227 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.228 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.229 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.230 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.231 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.232 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.233 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.234 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49
IP-MIB::ipNetToPhysicalPhysAddress.1107787875.ipv4.37.123.96.235 = STRING: 0:50:56:be:d0:49

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Accepted Solution

by:
farzanj earned 500 total points
ID: 39724901
Ok, try:

perl -ne 'if(($a,$b)=m{ipv4\.(\S+)\s=\sSTRING:\s(\S+)}) { $b =~ s/\b(\d)\b/0$1/g; print "$a --> $b\n";}' snmplogs/router.txt

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Expert Comment

by:farzanj
ID: 39724915
perl -ne 'if(($a,$b)=m{ipv4\.(\S+)\s=\sSTRING:\s(\S+)}) { $b =~ s/\b(\d)\b/0$1/g; print "$a --> $b\n";}' file

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This is what I get:

172.16.1.21 --> 00:18:6e:37:cf:28
172.16.1.22 --> 00:01:e8:d6:53:37
10.1.1.1 --> 00:01:e8:d6:53:37
37.123.96.3 --> 00:50:56:be:70:d8
37.123.96.5 --> 00:04:ac:e3:e8:49
37.123.96.6 --> 00:04:ac:e3:e8:49
37.123.96.9 --> 02:d0:68:12:4b:cc
37.123.96.18 --> 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
37.123.96.19 --> 90:2b:34:9d:53:cb
37.123.96.20 --> 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
37.123.96.21 --> 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
37.123.96.34 --> e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
37.123.96.35 --> e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
37.123.96.36 --> 90:2b:34:a0:42:f3
37.123.96.39 --> e0:69:95:2e:90:a4
37.123.96.67 --> b8:ac:6f:97:82:6f
37.123.96.116 --> 00:04:ac:e3:e8:49
37.123.96.162 --> 00:50:56:be:36:c1
37.123.96.178 --> 00:50:56:96:50:fa
37.123.96.179 --> 00:50:56:96:03:8b
37.123.96.180 --> 00:50:56:96:03:c3
37.123.96.181 --> 00:50:56:96:03:8b
37.123.96.182 --> 00:50:56:96:03:8b
37.123.96.183 --> 00:50:56:96:03:8b
37.123.96.184 --> 00:50:56:96:03:c3
37.123.96.185 --> 00:50:56:96:25:99
37.123.96.188 --> 00:50:56:96:03:c3
37.123.96.189 --> 00:50:56:96:03:8b
37.123.96.226 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.227 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.228 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.229 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.230 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.231 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.232 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.233 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.234 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49
37.123.96.235 --> 00:50:56:be:d0:49

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Author Closing Comment

by:3XLcom
ID: 39724918
That is it thanks .
0ne last question is there any wat the make all chars upper case
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Expert Comment

by:farzanj
ID: 39724940
Welcome.

Try this:
perl -ne 'if(($a,$b)=m{ipv4\.(\S+)\s=\sSTRING:\s(\S+)}) { $b =~ s/\b(\d)\b/0$1/g; print "$a --> ".uc($b)."\n";}' file

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Author Comment

by:3XLcom
ID: 39724949
perfect thnx
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