Solved

Increasing block size in VMWare

Posted on 2013-12-17
7
886 Views
1 Endorsement
Last Modified: 2013-12-17
I am running ESXi and now after years of operation one of the virtual servers require more space.  However, before I can increase the space I have to increase the block size because initially I used the default block size of 1kb (maximum 256 gbyte) which at the time was ample.

The question is: can I increase/change the block size after virtual machines are installed or do I require a clean and empty datastore to set the block size?

If changing the block size on the fly doesn't affect the VM then I can easily proceed with it but I am thinking since it changes everything at the block level then it will alter the whole datastore meaning that it will affect all VMs installed in that datastore.  So in such case then I will have to either reinstall the VMs or do a backup then restore after the block size is changed before I can use a partition tool to increase the size of the VM.

Any thoughts?

Thanks!
1
Comment
Question by:Wayne88
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 3
7 Comments
 
LVL 121
ID: 39724585
The question is: can I increase/change the block size after virtual machines are installed or do I require a clean and empty datastore to set the block size?

I'm afraid not. You do require an unformatted disk, and create a new datastore of correct block size.

You will need to

1. Backup VMs.
2. Remove the existing datastore
3. Reformat the datastore with correct blocksize.
4. Restore VMs.

It cannot be done with VMs on, it's set when the datastore is created and formatted.

if version 4.x., I would set to 8mb!

• 1MB block size – 256GB maximum file size
• 2MB block size – 512GB maximum file size
• 4MB block size – 1024GB maximum file size
• 8MB block size – 2048GB maximum file size

ESXi 5.x and later just set to 1MB
0
 
LVL 17

Assisted Solution

by:Andres Perales
Andres Perales earned 50 total points
ID: 39724586
You don't mention what version of ESXi you are using, but in essence what you can do if you have storage space available is to create a new datastore with the correct block size that you would like, and then do a storage migration to the new datastore!  Delete that old datastore and then recreate a new datastore or expand the existing data store.
0
 
LVL 18

Author Comment

by:Wayne88
ID: 39724627
Correction to my description that  the current block size is 1 MB not 1 KB and when I tried creating a new VM it shows 256 GB limit.  Sorry I forgot to mention that I am using ESXi 5.x

Does the difference in version matter or do I still need to manually set the block size?

Thanks.
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 121

Accepted Solution

by:
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 100 total points
ID: 39724655
Did you upgrade this from ESXi/ESX 4.x?

Is the VMFS version still 3.54 and not 5.0?

Block Size in ESXi 5.0 is 1MB, and you should be able to create a 2TB-512byte disk, but depends if it's an upgraded version!
0
 
LVL 18

Author Comment

by:Wayne88
ID: 39724667
Yes it was upgraded from ESXi from version 4.x

In such case then since I am going to be deleting and restoring all the VMs then I guess it will make more sense to also do a clean install a full 5.x version not upgrade to do away with the limitation of the upgraded version.
0
 
LVL 18

Author Closing Comment

by:Wayne88
ID: 39724674
Thanks for the help everyone and good answers!

Unfortunately I don't have anymore storage space available and cannot do as Paralesa suggested.  It's however a valid an excellent suggestion.
0
 
LVL 121
ID: 39724870
I would recommend a fresh install every time!
0

Featured Post

Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows Powershell® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If we need to check who deleted a Virtual Machine from our vCenter. Looking this task in logs can be painful and spend lot of time, so the best way to check this is in the vCenter DB. Just connect to vCenter DB(default DB should be VCDB and using…
In this article, I will show you HOW TO: Install VMware Tools for Windows on a VMware Windows virtual machine on a VMware vSphere Hypervisor 6.5 (ESXi 6.5) Host Server, using the VMware Host Client. The virtual machine has Windows Server 2016 instal…
This tutorial will give a short introduction and overview of Backup Exec 2012 and how to navigate and perform basic functions. Click on the Backup Exec button in the upper left corner. From here, are global settings for the application such as conne…
To efficiently enable the rotation of USB drives for backups, storage pools need to be created. This way no matter which USB drive is installed, the backups will successfully write without any administrative intervention. Multiple USB devices need t…

688 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question