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Linux script to copy files from host to host

Posted on 2013-12-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-18
I am using RHEL 6.4

Regarding an earlier post where I discovered that I could run a remote script from my host as follows:

putty -t user@host -pw password -m local_commands_file

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I want to write a script that will either:

1> Copy a file from the calling machine to the remote machine

2> Copy a file from one remote machine to another

How can I do this ?

Thanks
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Question by:Los Angeles1
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woolmilkporc earned 2000 total points
ID: 39724878
I strongly assume that you can't install pscp (?), which would make things quite easy.

(1) Moreover, your first requirement cannot be satisfied, because we have different operating systems, so we need a compatible file transfer, like FTP or the mentioned scp (over ssh). PuTTY alone cannot do this.

2) Copying between remote Linux hosts is possible, but please be aware that ssh/scp on Unix/Linux do not allow specifying a password on the command line.

Anyway:

On your Windows machine putty to the host where you want to copy from (host1) like this:

putty -t user@host1 -pw password -m local_commands_file

and let "local_commands_file" contain

scp /source_file_spec user@host2:/target_spec

where host2 is the machine you want to copy to.

Please note again, you must have set up passwordless (public key) authentication between the machines host1 and host2, otherwise you will be prompted for a password.

wmp
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by:gilesb2002
ID: 39727830
Below is an example of how I do this with and expect script. We have a server that process large amount of files. The script below copies files from several different locations to that server for processing.

The script copies a file passed to it from the command line from a remote server to the local server. You can change the scp command to move the to and from wherever you want.

The file does contain the password in plain text so make sure it only has the necessary read/write permissions. Also you will have to manually ssh into the remote servers from where the script is ran before the script will work. This is so that you can accept the RSA key from the remote server. You could modify the script to send back yes when prompted if you wanted.

#!/usr/bin/expect -f

# Expect script to supply root/admin password for remote ssh server 
# and execute command.

# set Variables
set filetoget [lrange $argv 0 0] 

set username <your user>
set password <your users password>

# remote IP address
set ipaddr <IP address of remote server>
set timeout -1
   
# now connect to remote UNIX box (ipaddr) with given script to execute
spawn scp $username@$ipaddr:/$filetoget /<destination>/
match_max 100000

# Look for passwod prompt
expect "*?assword:*"

# Send password aka $password 
send -- "$password\r"

# send blank line (\r) to make sure we get back to gui
send -- "\r"

expect eof

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Author Closing Comment

by:Los Angeles1
ID: 39727939
The scp solved many a problem.  

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