DNS server question

What record does make up a name server basically what record are need to make up a dns server for eg. A record
ciscosuppAsked:
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QlemoConnect With a Mentor Batchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
SRV records are used for special services which do not have an own record type (no MX, NS, ...). Well-known services used in SRV entries are listed at http://www.dns-sd.org/ServiceTypes.html . "domain" fits here, but I wouldn't use that one.

Instead of DNS forwarders you can use NS records, as described above. But that puts the DNS query load to the client, and does (usually) not allow for centralized DNS entry caching.
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
The DNS server itself doesn't need records. You provide its IP somewhere, and that makes it a DNS server - the corresponding server process running presumed.
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ciscosuppAuthor Commented:
please don't answer when you don't know thanks Qlemo
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Maybe you should rephrase your question. What is it exactly you are asking for? DNS in Active Directory, DNS with BIND, ...? Or are you asking how other DNS server now which DNS server they should ask for specific domains? The more exact you are, the better the answers.
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ciscosuppAuthor Commented:
Sorry about this a colleague I’m working with posted it. I did not lock out of my pc :-)

Basically what records make up DNS server AD integrated or BIND Linux dns server
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
As said, in that case there is no server record needed (but it will exist, at least as usual A and PTR). By default, a DNS server does not need to contain ANY records.

When you configure your network adapter, you set up the DNS server IP address, and the default DNS suffix. And that is all which is needed to get addresses resolved for internal access.

However, to access other DNS servers, for Internet access, you need to have DNS forwarders or DNS root hints. Root hints are the DNS servers of last resort, and should usually not been queried against; they will not contain any real IP addresses, only other DNS servers (as NS records).
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ciscosuppAuthor Commented:
Ok

I have a couple of child domains in my forest which all are Microsoft DNS (AD Integrated) servers which I synchronize with a third party dns server.



I want to point all my clients to the third party dns server because I have a lot of child domains.

What record must I add to my third party dns server or must I ony give it a ip
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Complex topic. Best solution IMHO is that you keep your local AD DNS servers as primary DNS, and either
* establish specific DNS forwarders for all child domains - can get messy
or
* establish a single DNS forwarder for the root domain, pointing to one DNS server (might be the 3rd-party one). This DNS server than needs to have all DNS forwarding entries.

The DNS forwarding entries aren't just another DNS records - they are used by the DNS server itself to ask other DNS servers, and cache the retrieved info.

If you would set up NS records, the DNS server just tells "ask that DNS server", and the client as to do another DNS query.
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ciscosuppAuthor Commented:
Ok my last question

Can I use a srv record instead of a forwarder  for my domains please advice if possible
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ciscosuppAuthor Commented:
So do you think forwarders will be the best solution?
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Yes, DNS forwarders are the best solution.
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