msv to mp3 conversion

I have a CD with some msv files (a proprietary audio file created by Sony). Normally these files won't play on Windows unless you install a plug-in. I installed the plug-in and now I can play them. Problem is: I have many other users who need to play these files on their PCs. I don't want to go around to everyone's PC and have to install the plug-in, and then have to restart their PCs.
     Is there a free utility that can convert these files into a more common format (like mp3)? I have Audacity. Would that do it?
john8217Asked:
Who is Participating?

Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
 
TobiasHolmConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi!

My best bet would be ffmpeg or vlc player, but when looking in the ffmpeg source code and searching the net I can't find any info about msv files. If msv is a proprietary format then it would not be possible to add support in ffmpeg, legally.

But you could do a workaround by playing the files on a PC with the codec installed, and then recording the output with Audacity. Then save the files as MP3. But this might be to much work depending on how many files you'd want to convert.

Also, you could try to install ffmpeg and see if it work with the msv files. Maybe the codec is called something else and there might be built in support for the format. Or attach an example msv file here and I can try to convert the file and see if it works.

Regards, Tobias
0
 
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
Technically the format is Long-term Predicted Excitation Coding (LPEC) which as you say is proprietary to Sony's second generation voice recorders.

Apart from Sony's own WMP plug-in which you've already obtained there isn't anything other than Sony's own software that will read this format. Audacity doesn't support it even though the codecs are installed on your PC.

I use Sound Forge (a Sony product) a lot for audio files and from version 9 that supports LPEC with an option to convert - but Sound Forge is not a cheap option.  As a "one off" you may find a demo version that will allow you to process the file but if this is something you need to do on a regular basis adding the free plug-in to your other user's PCs may be a better long term solution.

http://dspcdn.sonycreativesoftware.com/releasenotes/soundforge90e_readme_enu.htm
0
 
deroodeSystems AdministratorCommented:
You could also go the other way: instead of trying to convert the file you could capture the music which is playing:

http://www.totalrecorder.com/capture_sound.htm

With totalrecorder you can capture any playing souds. It's not free, but there is a free trial with a small limitation: If the program is unregistered a short portion of noise is inserted into recorded sound about every one minute.

You could also play the music from your speakers, and record with a microphone. That's free, but you'll lose sound quality.
0
Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
TobiasHolmCommented:
Audacity can record any sound the computer is playing, and it's free.

Regards, Tobias
0
 
deroodeSystems AdministratorCommented:
Ah, didn't know that.
What i understand, recording streaming audio with Audacity uses your soundcard A/D and D/A converters. From the Audacity website:
Recording from an analog sound card is relatively inexact and lossy because the digital source is converted to analog to play it, then back to digital to record it.

Totalrecorder installs a virtual sound card, which captures the digital content that is sent to it.

But you're right, Audacity is free.
0
 
TobiasHolmCommented:
Yes, that's correct, Audacity captures processed audio data.

Regards, Tobias
0
 
john8217Author Commented:
Thanks
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.