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Linux, Scripting with environment

Posted on 2013-12-20
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Last Modified: 2013-12-20
I am using RHEL 6.5

This takes place on a single client only, no scp or ssh

I get the following:

[root@xxclnt2 home]# cat test
set | wc -l
[root@xxclnt2 home]#
[root@xxclnt2 home]# ./test
53
[root@xxclnt2 home]#
[root@xxclnt2 home]# set | wc -l
66

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So putting the "set | wc -l" inside of the script yields less environment variables than performing the same command outside of a script

Why is that.

Is there any way to get the full environment within the script 'test'

Thanks
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Question by:Los Angeles1
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3 Comments
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:acbxyz
ID: 39732537
Some variables are not exported to subshells.

You can try this:
cat - > test.sh <<EOF
set > vars-in-script.txt
EOF
bash test.sh
set > vars-in-shell.txt
diff vars-in-*

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I get differences like COLUMNS=80 / HISTFILE / HISTFILESIZE / HISTSIZE / LINES=24 / PS1 / PS2

If you want the complete set of variables don't execute the script with ./test or bash test / sh test but source it:
# source test
or shorter
# . test
In the latter case no subshell is created, the lines are executed within your shell.
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LVL 68

Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 39732551
"set" displays all variables and functions, whether the variables are exported to the environment or not - but only variables exported to the environment are inherited by a script.

"printenv" or "env", on the other hand,  display only variables which are part of the environment.
Run your script with "printenv" instead of "set" and compare the result with "printenv | wc -l" from the command prompt.
You will notice that there's no difference.

So it seems that your initialization file(s) contain variable assignments or function definitions which do not get "exported" to the environment. The shell itself also sets some "unexported" variables.
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:gt2847c
ID: 39732559
To add to the above, the "export" built-in bash function will show you which environment variables are marked for export to sub-shells and scripts.
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