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Pinging a host that has an incorrect gateway set

If I ping a host in a different subnet – separated by a router – and the destination host has an incorrect or missing default gateway set, will my ping succeed? What about a TCP connection like telnet or RDP? Is Linux behaviour here different to Windows?
Assumptions: my settings are correct, correct IP, GW, SM. The routers settings are correct. On the destination host, the IP and SM are correct; just the GW is wrong or missing.
Thanks in advance
Michael
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mikhael
Asked:
mikhael
2 Solutions
 
Craig BeckCommented:
No it won't work usually.  The PC in the other subnet won't know where to send the reply as it doesn't have the correct gateway.

If the other PC uses a different router address to the one the sending PC uses, it may have some success if routing is configured to redirect the other PC to the correct gateway.

However, if your network uses Proxy-ARP the PC with no gateway (not the wrong gateway) may be able to reply correctly.  If the gateway is set wrong it will fail unless routing is redirecting as I explained in the previous paragraph.
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Agree. The application protocol does not matter, that is telnet or RDP will be treated the same, and ICMP isn't different, though it is a different network layer.

Everything IP-based needs to know the route back to the source, as TCP/IP is defined as not requiring replies to travel the same way back they came in. If it were that way, every hop on the way would have to temporarily store the session info to allow that. Or packets would have to store the complete route they used. Both would require a lot of overhead, either in the packets or routers' memory, without any particular advantage.

The only way the setup with a "wrong" gateway works is if the "wrong" gateway still has sufficient forwarding info to direct the packet to another router which the proper info.
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gheistCommented:
You must use other machine in same subnet (physical and logical) as bad machine and reconfigure it.
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mikhaelSenior Sales EngineerAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys, that's what I thought - or rather what I've read. My question is kinda hypothetical. Years ago, I believed it would work, because I had experienced it working. Maybe it was Proxy-ARP or some sort of caching.
But I thought TCP being a "connection" protocol (as distinct to UDP, say) maybe establishes the connection and the reply "knows" the path back?
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Explained in http:a39735174 - the reply only knows the target, not the way. The path taken is not recorded in the packet, and that would be a prerequisite.

Recently we had network integrated devices (based on RTOS) with a incomplete implementation of the TCP/IP stack. That led to ignoring the subnet mask, and just blowing out all traffic back as if it were on the same network, no matter of IP addresses.
So, if the TCP/IP stack implementation is buggy, it might work without gateway, but only if no routing is needed. That is, two IP networks on the same physical network.
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ChiefITCommented:
It worked because of a fixed route or a cached route in Arpcache.
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mikhaelSenior Sales EngineerAuthor Commented:
thanks all.
I appreciate it
Michael
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