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temp profiles

I believe these are temp profiles. I just do not know too much about them.
Have Windows 2008 R2 with 17 remote desktop users.

Some users log in and under \users\username I see their directories including desktop.
Three users have many folders with numbers like
\users\username1
\users\username1.servername.000
\users\username1.servername.001
\users\username1.servername.002
etc up to .197
each folder only has one folder called AppData

How do I get rid of this and have the correct login profile like the other users?
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Alex Angus
Asked:
Alex Angus
1 Solution
 
Raheman M. AbdulSenior Infrastructure Support Analyst & Systems DeveloperCommented:
Try to remove the local profiles (rename them or move to another location).

Check the permissions on the user profile (c:\users\username) and it might have lost the permissions. Compare them with the other working user profile.

Refer the solutions in:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Server/Remote_Desktop-Terminal_Services/Q_23880003.html

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Q_28290445.html
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Manjunath SulladTechnical ConsultantCommented:
Please refer below troubleshooting steps,

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/31be4077-1e7c-4845-b707-ab37b7869292/users-in-our-2008-r2-terminal-services-farm-keep-getting-temporary-profiles-when-they-log-in?forum=winserverTS



1)  Some lousy HP printer drivers were causing additional registry hive entries to be created every single time a person logged in. This created a situation where a person's profile grew on a daily basis, hence why the problem became more acute over time.


2) NTuser.dat files were getting upwards of 150MB in many cases.  Some even higher.  After a few profiles of that size were loaded the profile service just just overwhelmed and couldn't take any new profiles so it started dishing out temp profiles.  Problem is that the HP drivers were screwing up the default user profile as well so even a temp profile was bloated and massive.


3) Some erroneous HP services were running  that should not have been.



So the solution to the problem was this:


1)  Disable the PML Driver HPZ12 and Net Driver HPZ12 services on every terminal server (we actually issues a group policy that disabled them company wide.  These things are pointless and don't need to run ever.


2)  Going into the registry to purge the services from there is recommended but not strictly necessary as long as they don't run.  They can be found in HKLM\system\currentcontrolset\services\  


They keys will be named PML Driver HPZ12 and Net Driver HPZ12 respectively.  Just delete them.


3)  Go into the folder c:\windows\system32\spool\drivers\w32x86\3\

Find the MSI files named cioum32.msi and hpzbdi32.msi

Delete them and replace with 0byte files of the same name.


I recommend going into the w64 folder and doing the same thing if you find them there.  Basically anywhere on the system you see those MSI files, replace them with 0 byte files.  You can do that by making a .txt file with that name, and renaming the extension to .msi


4)  Backup and delete the following registry keys:


HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\Install\Software\Hewlett-Packard

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\TerminalServer\Install\RefHive\Hewlett-Packard

HKU\.DEFAULT\Software\Hewlett-Packard


5)  Recreate blank registry keys with the same names as the ones you deleted in step 4.

6)  Reboot.


7)  Now comes the crappy part:  You have to go through ALL of your users terminal services profiles and wipe out their ntuser.dat file.  This will force them to lose  a lot of custom settings like their desktop icon positions, maybe some stuff like email signatures, etc..
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serialbandCommented:
After you've fixed the root problem, you can delete profiles quickly with the Resource kit Tool delprof.exe

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=5405
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