?
Solved

files backed up knowledge

Posted on 2014-01-02
11
Medium Priority
?
141 Views
Last Modified: 2014-01-19
do all files resident on an NTFS file system know when they were last backed up? Are there any tools to show "this file hasnt been backed up recently", and if so where is it pulling that information from?
0
Comment
Question by:pma111
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 6
  • 4
11 Comments
 
LVL 25

Accepted Solution

by:
Cyclops3590 earned 1000 total points
ID: 39751412
The archive bit on each file is what is used to know if it was backed up or not.  Not all backup utilities use that, but generally that is what is used.  When a file is backed up, the archive bit is cleared.  When the file changes, the archive bit is set to let the backup software know it needs to be archived again as something has changed.
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:pma111
ID: 39751420
Would there be any tools then to show "no recent backup" type reports?
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 39751422
whatever backup tool you use should have logging.  that is where you'd find that information.
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:pma111
ID: 39751427
but nothing external to any backup software that you could run over the drive to show no recent backup files, using the flag you mentioned above?
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 39751443
use the following command

dir /s /b /A:A /O:-S [starting path]

but again, it depends on if the tool you use use's the archive bit or not.  the windows backup tool will use that though.  That command gives you a list of files with the archive bit set but depends on the starting path you give it.
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:pma111
ID: 39751448
can you elaborate on the "starting path" please?

be useful to udnerstand the switches used in the command too to get an understanding on what its reporting?
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 39751449
like C:\ or C:\Windows.  Whatever path you want to look for the files.  It just gives a starting point and looks down from there.
0
 
LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 1000 total points
ID: 39751479
Apart from what has already been said, the archive bit doesn't tell you anything about when the file was last backed up. It only tells you, if it is set, that it has been backed up. But if anything gets changed in the file, that bit gets unset. So once that has happened, you won't know whether the file was ever backed up or not. It only tells you something has changed with the file, or it has never been backed up yet, so it should get backed up (again) with the next backup task.

So as has already been mentioned, the only reliable way to check this is to go through the logs of your backup utility.
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:pma111
ID: 39751481
thanks. be useful to understand the switches used in the command too to get an understanding on what its reporting?
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 39751520
dir /s /b /A:A /O:-S [starting path]

/s - all files in current directory and sub directories
/b - list one directory/file one per line
/A:A - files ready for archiving
/O:-S  - order by size, largest first

all parameters of dir command
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/dir.mspx?mfr=true
0
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 39751527
and rindi is right, there's still no real reliable way to know when the file was last modified.  While files/directories do have time entries recorded in their meta-data on a per object basis, those don't necessary change with the archive bit reliably either.  As rindi and I mentioned though, the backup log is your best bet to know what the backup job actually did.
0

Featured Post

Complete VMware vSphere® ESX(i) & Hyper-V Backup

Capture your entire system, including the host, with patented disk imaging integrated with VMware VADP / Microsoft VSS and RCT. RTOs is as low as 15 seconds with Acronis Active Restore™. You can enjoy unlimited P2V/V2V migrations from any source (even from a different hypervisor)

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Ever visit a website where you spotted a really cool looking Font, yet couldn't figure out which font family it belonged to, or how to get a copy of it for your own use? This article explains the process of doing exactly that, as well as showing how…
This article shows how to use a free utility called 'Parkdale' to easily test the performance and benchmark any Hard Drive(s) installed in your computer. We also look at RAM Disks and their speed comparisons.
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial s…
Finding and deleting duplicate (picture) files can be a time consuming task. My wife and I, our three kids and their families all share one dilemma: Managing our pictures. Between desktops, laptops, phones, tablets, and cameras; over the last decade…
Suggested Courses

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question