Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1117
  • Last Modified:

Converting Classic ASP scripts to another development language

Hello Experts,

For the last 10  years I’ve developed my website in Classic ASP – but reluctantly accept, with Microsoft ceasing support of Classic ASP in 2018, I need to bite the bullet and convert all my Classic ASP scripts into another development language – the question is which one?!

I want the learning curve from Classic ASP to the new development language to be as simple as possible and the development language of choice to be around for the next 15 years or so!

Asp.Net seems the obvious answer, but I have not gone through the process of converting my Classic ASP scripts yet – I wanted to take the advice from those who have already done it.

Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks

JamWales
0
Jamie
Asked:
Jamie
  • 4
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloperCommented:
Classic ASP and .Net are not the same thing other then you could use some of your vbs skills.  PHP is probably more close to what you are using in classic ASP.  

Think about not using any server side language.  Instead, create webservices for your database functions and use javascript/jquery ajax.   In the end, that will make cross development (web & mobile) easier.

No matter which choice you use, just know there will be a learning curve.  I think the hardest part is when you can easily create what you need in ASP and you can't (right away) in the other language.

What types of sites and applications do you work on?
0
 
Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloperCommented:
Where did you get the end of life date for asp?  

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2669020
The next major version of Internet Information Services (IIS) will be shipped as part of the Windows 8 operating system. The use of ASP pages will be supported on Windows 8 for a minimum of 10 years from the Windows 8 release date.

Windows 8 released 2013.  So you should be good at least through 2023.
0
 
JamieAuthor Commented:
Hi Scott,

Thank you for your quick reply.

Currently my server is running Windows Server 2008 R2 64 bit - I know there is a Windows Server 2012 - which has suddenly (finally) dawned on me as being Windows 8 Server - am I right?!

If so, I'm in the clear, once I upgrade to Windows 2012 Server...

... if not,  it's a single, MSSQL database driven website, which also uses Windows 64 bit components, e.g. AspUpload, AspPDF and AspJPeg etc.

Many thanks

JamWales
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
Big MontySenior Web Developer / CEO of ExchangeTree.org Commented:
If your sole reason for wanted to update your sites is solely because "everyone else says its time", I would seriously re-evaluate your needs. Ask yourself this: is everything running smoothly without issue? if your answer is yes, then I would say you don't need to upgrade your sites!

there's something to that old say "if it ain't broke, then don't try to fix it". It makes little sense to me to rip apart and re-do everything in a new language just because it's the new "hot" thing these days. What happens in 2 years or so when a new technology comes along and everyone dubs it the next best thing? If everything is running smoothly now, then leave it the heck alone and just let it do its thing! If your hosting doesn't support classic asp, then double check on why (I've yet to hear of any version of IIS NOT supporting classic asp, it just may not be turned on by default. that's like buying a new car because the tires you want don't fit!

now, to contradict myself :), there ARE a lot of good reasons TO upgrade to a new technology. If you're looking to advance your own personal knowledge and want to remain a hot commodity in the professional world, being up to date on the latest technologies will help ensure your ability to stand out when looking for a new job. If your application has performance issues or just issues in general, then maybe a rewrite in a new language will help you iron out those issues.

As for which language, do your research and see which one appeals to you. As mentioned above, PHP most closely resembles ASP, but you may prefer .NET's object-oriented approach. It's whatever you think is a best fit to your learning style.

Just make sure you're upgrading for the right reasons :)
0
 
Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloperCommented:
What he ^ said.

I use Persists as well but not aspPDF.  I always wondered how well it worked.

I am starting to change the way I develop and take a bigger step and use html and js on the front end and webservices on the back end.  

If you are not at least familiar with js/jquery I would start that.  A good place to learn is http://www.codecademy.com/learn.  Spend a few hours at a time and go through the first  portion of javascript, then mix it up with jquery.  I would force yourself to get to the end of both of these. (html5/css if too).

You can test out a few languages as well.  If you want to stay with Microsoft servers, the .NET mvc would be very good thing to know.

Before switching  language(s), decide what you will be doing going forward.  Just making front end websites?  Applications?

In ASP we do things the hard way like using aspJPEG (I use imagemagick now) or encryption.  A lot of this is available in php.
0
 
Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloperCommented:
ooohhh.. I good place to play with other languages outside of .NET is koding.com
0
 
JamieAuthor Commented:
Hi Scott and Big Monty,

Thank you for your replies - very wise words from you both - as you say, there is no rush, so plenty of time for me to ponder my options!


Regards

JamWales
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

  • 4
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now