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Where does powerline networking end?

Posted on 2014-01-02
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Last Modified: 2014-01-17
Powerline adapters are popular as solutions to wifi range issues in homes... but where does the powerline network access end?

For example, when using them in a single family home with its own electrical panel, is the network accessible beyond the panel... e.g. next door.

I know you can encrypt the signals, but still wondering what the exposure is once you start using these devices in a home.

Thanks for any info or direction anyone can provide.

Tomster2
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Question by:Tomster2
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by:Jeremy Weisinger
Jeremy Weisinger earned 1000 total points
ID: 39752621
It gets pretty noisy but it is possible that your neighbor could see some traffic with the right equipment. If you have a surge suppressor or power conditioner between the adapter and your neighbor, they won't be able to pick anything up.

Since it's not likely that you'll have that the best thing to do is use the encryption.
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Darr247 earned 1000 total points
ID: 39752629
It generally ends at the transformer that steps down the voltage from transmission to user levels... the length of the wires that make up the windings inside the transformer exceed the distance the powerline signals can travel without a boost) so if you share a transformer with your neighbor[s] (and most homes do, in urban areas; but homes out in the country, and commercial buildings, generally do not share a transformer).  That's why the manufacturers give powerline users a way to enrypt the signals between the devices... then others can't eavesdrop by simply capturing the signal; they would still have to decrypt it.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Tomster2
ID: 39789758
Thanks for your replies.
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