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Recovering IIS 6 config files from a dead W2k3 server

Posted on 2014-01-04
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Last Modified: 2014-02-21
Hi all,

Today I came into my office to find our test / play IIS6 W2k3 sever had died, specifically the motherboard fried.

We have a good backup of the hard drive from the dead server, and the hard drive still works, so is there any way to pull the IIS config files from the old hard drive, and then move them and the sites to a new w2k3 server.

Thanks,

Neil
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Question by:CaBrit
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Dave_Dietz earned 2000 total points
ID: 39756753
Yes and no.

There are a number of encrypted fields in the Metabase.xml file (c:\windows\system32\inetsrv\metabase.xml) that are encrypted using a machinekey tied to the OS.

What you will need to do is to manually remove all the encrypted fields and replace the existing Metabase.xml file on the new server with the edited version from the old server.  When you start IIS it should see that there are fields missing and it will add these using the machinekey from the new server.

Give it a shot and see how it works for you.

Dave Dietz
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by:CaBrit
ID: 39877502
We got lucky, we found a exact match for the motherboard on ebay so were able to get the old hard drive up again.

Now with the heat off we tried Dave's idea, and yes, it sort of worked. IIS complained, and the sites would not run, but, they were all there, and most of the info was, so it was just a case of going into each one and editing it.

Now to find a better way to back up.
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